Pickling Time and Chunking Kale

A distressed mother barges into a Rabbi’s study:

“Rabbi, my son has gone meshuge (crazy)!”

“Calm down, lady, have you taken him to a specialist? What makes you think that?”

“Specialist-shmeshalist! Who needs specialists? I am a mother, I know!”

“But, dear lady, what does he do?”

“Oy, Rabbi, he eats pigs and dances with girls!”

“Listen,” – says the Rabbi with a sigh, – “If it were the other way around, that is, if he were dancing with pigs and eating girls, you would have a cause to worry. As it is, he is young and is simply going through a stage.”

Related image

Unfortunately, even the great Salvador Dali could not come up with a way of pickling time or preserving it in any other way. Therefore, we’ll have to listen to the Rabbi and do it “the other way around.” We’ll pickle kale, and we’ll let a specialist, in this case a brilliant one, teach us how to chunk time.

time-and-calendar

Please welcome Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC, with her excellent articles

Chunking TIME to get you going

and

Time, Stress and Denial

Make sure you don’t miss the announcement of the upcoming tele-class at the end of the second article, and, of course, come back for the recipe!

pkld kale stms 1.jpg

I’ve been making kale chips (please see here) practically every day – we are meshuge (crazy) about them! The first step in making them is to remove the stems, and what should I do with a huge accumulated bundle of “superfood” stems? So I dice some into soups and stews, and I pulverize some to make Green Garlic Galettes (please see here), but the bundle still grows exponentially, threatening to take over my refrigerator space – “The Invasion of Superfood”! An intrepid adventurer, I pickled them. I figured, with lots of garlic and a little bit of time, it won’t go wrong!

pkld kale stms 2.jpg

And it didn’t! I used a slight variation on my standard pickling recipe (please see here): I used cilantro instead of dill and added grated ginger. Why? I have no idea! I felt that kale, cilantro, and ginger should be friends, so I introduced them to each other and gave them a couple of days to get better acquainted.

This is the incredible African American tenor and movie star Harry Belafonte singing in Hebrew: “How good and pleasant it is for brothers to be together” (Psalm 133). Searching through many variations of songs using this Psalm, I almost cried when I found this one. It is the one we used to sing saying our farewells to friends and relatives who were allowed to leave the Soviet Union, while most of us were left behind the iron curtain. It is the one that would get us arrested more often than not, yet we kept singing it, defying the communist dictatorship that separated brothers and promoted suspicion and hatred for foreigners, instead of love.

pkld kale stms 3

It is truly good and pleasant for all of us, brothers and sisters around the world, to be together and learn from each other. It is also good for kale stems, chunked and combined with garlic, ginger, and cilantro, to be together and enhance each other’s flavors. It takes from one to a few days, depending on the temperature and sun exposure. It is ready when the stems lose their bright green color and the brine turns muddy. I asked my husband to taste, to make sure it was ready. So he tasted, and tasted, and tasted… That’s about how much I was able to save to take a picture!

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups of kale stems, cut into 2 – 3 inch (5 – 7 cm) lengths
  • 1 head of garlic, peeled, cloves cut lengthwise
  • 1 inch (2.5 cm) ginger, grated
  • A loose handful of fresh cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • 3 cups boiling water

PROCEDURE

  • Place all ingredients, except cilantro, into glass, ceramic, or enamel container, shake lightly to distribute evenly.
  • Dilute salt in boiling water, pour into container. Make sure kale stems are covered with saline solution. More saline solution should be added, if needed.
  • Place cilantro on top, cover tightly.
  • Keep in sunny room temperature place until stems lose bright color and brine looks muddy. Refrigerate when ready. Drain before serving.

Enjoy!

 

63 Comments Add yours

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Like

  1. Mr. Militant Negro says:

    Reblogged this on The Militant Negro™.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Mr. Militant Negro says:

        Always my dear lady. Hope you’re enjoying your Monday.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am, and I hope you are starting off into an enjoyable week.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Mr. Militant Negro says:

        With good bloggin friends like you, I am off to a great week.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thank you, kind sir!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Dolly, you are probably the most creative blogger on the planet! How you managed to work in my Time Management articles into a article about pickled kale is a true miracle of creativity – and I thank you SO much for helping me spread the word (as well as for the lovely endorsement about the content on my blog).

    MANY hugs of gratitude my dear kitchen dervish.
    xx,
    mgh

    Liked by 3 people

    1. PS. Reading your touching words about the song you sang as friends and brothers left Russia brought tears to my eyes – and knowing your back-story let them fall freely as I listened.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I thank you for empathy – a rare gift in our times!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Of COURSE, Dolly. Remember, I started out as an actor, so I slip into the shoes of another easily.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I know that, but in my former life, I’ve met a great many actors, and a few of them became personal friends, but empathy was a very rare quality among the lot. Most actors are notoriously self-centered (present company excluded, of course!).

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I never understood that, personally. Acting IS empathizing with your character – and paying enough attention to the emotions of others to be able to portray them onstage.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Were you trained by the Method? Just curious because I think it does make the difference.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I got my training from various sources – but I did study for a bit with a teacher who came up with her own “method,” modified from what she felt didn’t work with Strasberg’s.

        She died shortly after I began studying with her, but she was the absolute best acting teacher I ever had. You had to audition to even get into her classes.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I was talking about Stanislavsky’s Method, which was based on producing emotions on cue, regardless of the character. He would verbally abuse actors during rehearsals and bring them to tears, then tell them to access this feeling of being abused when they had to show grief on stage.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Totally stupid – as if they didn’t have enough legit feelings to access! Are we sure he really did that?
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Chekhov’s wife Olga Knipper complained about it, and Bulgakov mentioned it as well. Apparently, Stanislavsky felt that their feelings were not dramatic enough to bring out the full impact of Chekhov’s plays. Perhaps he was justified, since the plays, if you read them, are quite understated, with subtle play of emotions. They wouldn’t have been effective on stage, and in fact, “The Seagull”was a flop, when premiered.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. I’d blame the director for the flop! The actors I worked with most of the time were all fully trained and knew how to tap into authentic emotional reserves without the tricks.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      11. Hard to say today. Stanislavsky was considered a genius in his times, and we can’t assume that everybody who said so was an idiot. And Moscow Art Theater that he had founded is famous to this day by the authenticity of acting and richness of emotional expression. Go figure!

        Like

    2. Oh I don’t know – to crazy people it comes naturally! You know how a centipede was asked how it coordinated all its legs? It started thinking about the process and it never moved again!
      I don’t think about the process – it happens.
      You are most welcome – anything I can do to help!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I can relate to that poor centipede. When I was learning to walk again after being in a hip-cast on a badly broken leg for almost a year (years ago now), I had to talk myself through the movements sub-vocally.

        The day I walked from my apartment to the corner (grumbling to myself about something else) then suddenly noticed that I had NO attention on walking, my mood went from grumpy to glorious in a heartbeat!
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Exactly – re-directing thought process by re-directing emphasis.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. A technique that works amazingly well in a number of arenas. 🙂
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Absolutely! “Real heroes always find a detour,” – says a character in a Russian movie.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. [ Laughs ] Humorous, entertaining and delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Renard – enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. That’s a brilliant idea! I don’t use kale that often, but I will keep it in mind for next time I buy it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, Ronit! Coming from you, it means a lot to me!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Eartha says:

    Waste not the Kale stems. This is a very creative recipe, Dolly. You’ve taught me something. Thanks for sharing. Going to peep your kale chips now. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Eartha, I am so glad you like it! I know how much you promote “the Green Goddess” and I hope you enjoy my little invention!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Great post, as always 🌱💕

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Samantha! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for the always wonderful entertainment with great knowledge transfert. Have a nice week ahead. 😉 Michael

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You too, Michael! 😻

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you very much for another great story with recipe. Its greatest entertainment ever. Have a nice week ahead. 😉 Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Michael, you are flattering me too much! Thank you! Have a great week as well!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. You are the (Raider of the Lost Ark character, that I can’t remember his name- Harrison Ford) of cooks!! What an adventure!
    Off to go read Madelyn’s articles.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Neh, I am much worse than him – whatever his name! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Kae Bucher says:

    Hi Dolly:)… I brine some too but haven’t yet this year because of concerns about whether or not temperature is too high yet… what is the warmest temperature your tones have been subjected to … and still fermented successfully?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Kae, the warmer, the better! I make my saline solution with boiling water because I don’t have a warm place, and still it takes a few days. If it’s hot, you can brine it with room temp water, and it’ll be ready in a day. BTW, I haven’t posted it yet, but I’ve added carrot sticks to my latest batch of kale stems, and it came out great.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Kae Bucher says:

        Thanks so much 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for sending your wonderfully talented daughter to my kitchen – I am so impressed! 😸

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Reblogged this on koolkosherkitchen and commented:

    Today is the Green Day (or the Greens Day). I think every day should be one! Today’s Ragtag word prompt is PICKLE.: https://ragtagcommunity.wordpress.com/2018/06/08/rdp-9-pickle/
    I am covering both bases, here, Beautiful People – enjoy!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much for pingback!

      Like

  11. Osyth says:

    How much did I adore this? So much that I can’t stretch my arms that wide! The Jewish mother, the reference to Salvador Dali and his sensational surrealism guiding us into a recipe for Pickled Kale of all things. Which I must try of course. You make me laugh, you make me learn and you make me sit trance-like as I listen to the heavenly Harry Belafonte sing in Hebrew. Without you I would never have found that despite loving harry to Heaven and back again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wonder whether you would understand this Russian saying: Ах какие вензеля выписывает моя мысля. It describes my style of writing precisely; I am simply having unadulterated fun with whatever comes into my crazy head. Yours is described in one word, EBULIENT. Thank you for your ebulient comment and for your unwavering support, dear Osyth!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Osyth says:

        Why waiver when one is having such fun! I did understand the saying and I love it! We have but one of these things we call life, Dolly. You have lived a life that has not always been easy but you counter it with a present-day that oozes joy and delight. I hold you as an exemplar of a lady who understands the silver linings, the diamonds in the rough and the wonder that is living if we allow ourselves. And of course you understand that a big part of that contentment comes from reaching out and helping others. I’m proud to know you 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Blushing all over the internet! I am nothing special, just a specimen of my times and culture. I am delighted that you were able to understand the saying! I insist on being whimsical and having fun with it, and I thank you for understanding and support!😻

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Osyth says:

        Just. Don’t. Change! ❤️

        Liked by 1 person

      4. At my age, not likely. 😻

        Liked by 1 person

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