Fireworks and Fish

Happy, healthy, and safe 2021, Beautiful People!

Before all the festivities on Ocean Drive started (and ended up being cancelled anyway), we had escaped to our favorite Sunset Cove Resort on Key Largo. We have visited this place for years when we used to sail there, anchor the boat, and come ashore for a day or two, on the way to Key West. But now, due to Covid, it has acquired new significance; it is the only beach resort where not only the cottages and refurbished mobile homes, all stylishly appointed and with all amenities, but even the Tiki huts on the beach, which you will see in my slide show, are appropriately socially distanced.

We had anticipated a quiet, peaceful New Year on the beach, but did we get a surprise! The most spectacular fireworks show we have ever seen was unfolding right under our noses, from a barge less than a quarter mile from us, on the other side of the fishing dock. So we sat on warm sand, feet in water, toasting the New Year with Italian Prosecco, munching on fake cheese, real chocolate covered almonds, and my own almond cookies (recipe will be posted soon).

The next morning 2021 presented us with a gift – a glorious Floridian “golden season” day, bright and cheerful, not too hot, yet not too cold to swim and enjoy various water activities. Some revelers tried to cure holiday hangovers by availing themselves of the floating Tiki bar, slowly moving in front of the anchored boats. Others brought their own jet skis and were gleefully zipping to and fro. Still others took advantage of kayak and paddle boards, provided to guests free of charge. Children and dogs were happily splashing in crystal clear water. Sunset Cove is so animal-friendly that guests are offered dog beds and toys.

One little snorkeler brought ashore his trophy – a carapace of a stone crab.

“Yikes! – shrieked his mother, – is it dead?”

” Yes, mom, ” calmly replied the eight-year-old explorer, – “But he died many years ago and left his armor behind.”

I guess someone is into knights in shining armors.

My husband, AKA The Boss, was trying to catch dinner, but fish were not interested. I could’ve told him that because I haven’t seen the usual schools of baby fish while swimming.

“Schools are off on holiday,” – informed me the same little smart alec.

Finally, one little croacker took pity on the lonely fisherman, was triumphantly hauled up, scaled and cleaned, and filed away in the freezer for further reference. Croackers are Florida fish that come in several varieties, all kosher and all delicious, This one was a silver trout, which does not grow larger than about six inches; it was certainly not enough for dinner (don’t worry, Beautiful People, I had accounted for such eventuality by bringing store-bought perch). So in the little trout went, to await arrival of more fish, whether caught or bought, to be made into a Russian fish soup. Since I have not made it yet, I am repeating an older post.

Ukha – Russian Fisherman Soup

Equally loved by Ivan the Terrible and the poorest of peasants, this simple soup could be a clear fish broth or a thick stew. Or anything in between, for that matter, as long as a fish swam through it at some point. Initially, during Ivan the Terrible’s times, it was a clear broth, sometimes meat-based, and sometimes fish-based, served with famous Russian meat and fish pies, rasstegai and kulebyaki.  Tzar Ivan, the first Russian monarch who promoted himself from a Grand Prince to a Tzar of All Russia, was not so terrible at first. Actually, the label “terrible” is an inaccurate translation of Grozny, which means formidable, awe-inspiring, or courageous. He definitely was all that, climbing the throne at the age of 16 and eventually conquering and consolidating a huge Russian empire.

170px-ivan_the_terrible_26_son_-_detail

In some ways, though, he was truly terrible; he had a terrible temper. In one of those rages, he accidentally killed his son, as depicted in the famous painting by I. Repin. To atone for his sins, the Tzar became fanatically religious. He would abstain from meat not only during Lent, as prescribed, but also during self-appointed fasts. You could say that Ivan the Terrible was the first pescatarian. As  a result, meat-based ukha was fazed out, and the clear fish-based ukha became the trend.

ukha.jpg

Peasants loved it for a different reason. With dearth of meat and fowl, fish was still plentiful in rivers and lakes, and free! Thus from a royal table, ukha relocated to a simple kotelok, a cooking pot rounded on the bottom hanging over the fire. From a clear broth complementing an array of fancy pies, it became a stew filled with any root vegetables on hand: the ubiquitous Russian potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips, onions,  –  whatever they could dig up.  Enhanced by the smoky flavor from the bonfire, it was filling, nutritious, and totally scrumptious, I can tell you from first-hand experience! 

Ukha 1.jpg

The most important rule for a really rich and flavorful ukha is to cook the head and bones. In fact, you’ll see ukha recipes that include only fish heads. My grandmother, however, interpreted ukha as a fish chaulent, a Shabbos stew, so she cooked actual pieces of fish in it as well. As you see, the head of this Hog Snapper was huge, so I knew my ukha would come out full of flavor.

Ukha 3.jpg

This is one scary-looking fish!  I am glad he is going into the pot, to be rendered harmless. I used all the flesh of it for ceviche (please click here),  which left me the head, tail, skin, and bones. If you are concerned about the bones, you can wrap them in cheesecloth before placing them into the pot.However, I still remember sucking on those bones as a childhood treat.

Ukha 3a

You can use any root vegetables you like. I prefer the traditional onion, potato, turnip, carrot, beet, and celery combination.  Well, celery is on the fancy side for peasant Russia, but it lends a nice flavor.

Ukha 3b.jpg

There is an ongoing argument as to what goes into the pot first, fish or veggies.  I’ve heard some fishermen say that if you start with vegetables hoping to catch some fish, the fish will laugh at you! However, I still prefer to start with veggies because I like them really soft, especially beets, carrots, and turnip. I cut them all into bite size pieces and start cooking. Once the water boils, I add fish.  At this point I transfer it to a crock pot, but you can reduce heat to simmer and continue cooking stove top.

Ukha 4.jpg

It’s time to season my ukha with salt and pepper, peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf.  But there is one more vital ingredient, without which no ukha is complete. It is so important that there is a song about it.

The celebrated La Scala trained Russian dramatic baritone Muslim Magomaev is singing a folk song Vdol’ po Piterskoy (Along Piterskaya Street), which includes lyrics beseeching the good woman to take pity, cook ukha,  and not to forget parsley!

Ukha 5.jpg

In addition to lots of parsley, as the song demands, I also use some diced tomatoes and lemon juice. Purists will call it a deviation, and it’s true; Russian peasants definitely did not have tomatoes and have never seen lemons. But it contributes such a pleasant sour note that I still do it! Add it at the very end, so as not to lose the fresh look and flavor.

Ukha final

Here it is, and it was totally delicious and full of goodness!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 whole fish or fish heads and bones, about 1 1/2  – 2 lbs total
  • 1 medium potato
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 medium beet
  • 1 medium turnip (alternatively,  parsnip or parsley root)
  • 1 celery stalk
  • 2 – 3 large garlic cloves, diced
  • 4 -5 whole bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup fresh coarsely chopped parsley and more to garnish.

PROCEDURE

  • Peel all vegetables, cube into 1/3 inch (1 sq cm) pieces, place into 6 -quart pot, add water. Bring to boil.
  • Clean, scale, wash and cut fish, add to pot, bring to boil, transfer to crock pot set on low or reduce heat to simmer if cooking stove top.
  • Add garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Before serving, add lemon juice, diced tomato, parsley. Cook for 5 more minutes.
  • Serve garnished with parsley.

Enjoy!

50 Comments Add yours

  1. What a wonderful and flavorful experience! Happy New Year my friend!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, and the same to you and yours, dear Dorothy – happy, healthy, and safe!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. One of my favorite soup. I like the cat sitting there beside the beautiful bowl of soup! A great recipe and tips! 💖

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for a lovely comment, dear friend.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. A report on a good day; fascinating information about Ivan; and delicious looking stew

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ivan was a fascinating character in many ways. Thank you very much for a kind comment, Derrick.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. GP Cox says:

    I like each of the ingredients, so the soup MUST be quite tasty!! Thanks, Dolly!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is, GP. Go catch yourself some fish (hint: hit a nearest Publix), throw in any root vegetables you like, and feel Russian for a day.
      Thank you for stopping by and commenting, dear friend!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. purpleslob says:

    I had no idea he killed his son!! How horrible!! I hope it cured his temper!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Did not. When he was in a bad mood, he’d stick a dagger down someone’s throat just because he didn’t like the sound of a person’s voice.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. purpleslob says:

        WHOA!! Glad I was never around him!! He’d probably killed me for laughing too loud!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Nah, women were not allowed around him anyway, so you would be safe, behind a latticed screen.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I miss Florida, especially Key West. 🦩🌴🌊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Key West is always mobbed, regardless of Covid restrictions, so we don’t even go there now. You’ll have to wait until it is safe, dear Gail. I hope, though, that you consider visiting with me on South Beach, while on the way to the Keys!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We have family plans for the Gulf Shores in June. Keeping our fingers crossed as we had to cancel it last year. 🌊

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you as well, darling.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you. 🙏🏻🍃🧡

        Liked by 1 person

  7. CarolCooks2 says:

    So pleased you were able to see the New Year in on the beach how lovely and that soup looks and sounds delicious 🙂 xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for a lovely comment, dear Carol!

      Like

      1. CarolCooks2 says:

        Well deserved darling…Hugs xx

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Charlee: “Mmmm, fish!”
    Chaplin: “We’ll just take it whole please!”
    Lulu: “Can I roll in it first?”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Lulu, it’s so small that it is nothing to roll in. And guys, it’s too small even for one cat, let alone two. Sorry!
      Meows and Purrs from The Cat Gang.

      Like

  9. Boiling up your own stock makes a world of difference. Happy New Year!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mimi. Happy New Year to you and yours!

      Like

  10. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    FISH HEAD SOUP—!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. YOU ARE VERY WELCOME, SIS!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Love it! Happy New Year! Lots of wide open space on the pier. What a Wow Food share!🍂🍮🍂🌺🔔

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, darling! Happy, healthy , and safe New Year to you!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. cookingflip says:

    😋🎣🐟🐠 Happy New Year, Dolly. 🎉🎊🎇

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, darling! And a happy, healthy and safe New Year to you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cookingflip says:

        Thank you! 🐱🌷

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Many thanx for the recipe and sharing your slide show.
    Art

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank YOU so much for stopping by and commenting, dear Art!

      Like

  14. Great! Happy New Year to you all, too!! I hope you had a beautiful beginning of 2021, and Cuba is almost communistic as in the past. 😉 Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, dear Michael. I hope you had a nice beginning of the year as well.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you, Dolly! Here its all as normal as always, beside the pandemic blues. Its rural rurality. 😉 Be well too. Michael

        Liked by 1 person

      2. “Rural rurality” – cute! 😻

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you, Dolly! 😉 I am always happing looking at this by our roof cam, more than 200 km away from the location itself. Lol

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Sounds like a good idea, Michael. LOL

        Liked by 1 person

      5. LOl – Therefore cams are made. Better social distancing. 😉 Have a beautiful Friday, Dolly!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. You too, dear friend!

        Like

    1. Same to you, dear friend!

      Liked by 1 person

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