Double Chocolate Avocado Mousse

It’s all Carol’s fault – she made me do it! Lovely Carol of Retired? No one told me! She reminds us about the National Mousse Day and then makes an excellent point about all these “national” food days. You have to read her post to get the brunt of her argument: National Mousse Day…Yet another…

Pardon My French… Toast!

Lovely Carol of carolcooks2.com says that today is a National French Toast Day. I don’t know which nation, but I do have a delicious recipe to offer you, Beautiful People. One of those names that varied from country to country, it was called Spanish Toast in Germany, German Toast in Italy, Nun’s Toast in Spain,…

Something Wild About That Turkey

Of all the silly infantile jokes, this one takes the cake (or a pumpkin pie, in this case): What did the turkey say when he saw a computer? “Google, google, google!” I guess that was a wild turkey who had never been introduced to a Publix freezer. But then, if we believe the story about…

Seasoned Veterans and Young Chicken

To all veterans: Happy Veterans Day and thank you for your service! To all Marines: Happy Marine Birthday! This post is dedicated to Jennifer, a beautiful lady with a huge heart, originally from Jamaica, and a retired Marine. When I ran the school, Jennifer was my right hand, my left hand, and most of the…

Bitten by a Chicken – Honey Chicken Bites

Have you ever been bitten by a chicken? No? Chicken don’t bite? Are you sure? What about figuratively, rather than literally, when a whole bunch of people, almost three million of them, got bitten, that is, obsessed, by the same idea? It happened about thirty three hundred years ago, and those people were by no…

Spear Your Meat, But Don’t Spare Your Veggies: Shashlik

When you think of meat on skewers, you probably visualize this: Or, perhaps, if you are even slightly familiar with Georgian cuisine (a country, not a state), this: And you will be on the right track: regardless of countless variations of it, shishkebab definitely has a long military history. I couldn’t help but share with…

The Great and Glorious Fake Sauce

Louis XIV of France was a great and glorious king who has consolidated a great and glorious country by forging a centralized government – absolute monarchy. Having been scared out of his wits as a teenager during the Fronde rebellion, when he, his mother Anne of Austria –  the Regent, and Cardinal Mazarin fled from…

Hello, Beautiful People!

Today, when I transitioned from the kitchen to my computer (this is a Covid 19 jargon, Beautiful People; we don’t move – we transition), I found this: Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com! You registered on WordPress.com 4 years ago. Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging. It took me back to this day four years…

I Give You Roti And a Big Hug

Today is the International Dentist Day.  I am sure that many of you, Beautiful People, do not count your visits to a dentist among your most pleasant memories. I, on the other hand, vividly remember lines of patients by my father’s door who had preferred to wait (and suffer!) for hours in order to be…

Raisins in the Pudding

Over forty years ago, as I landed in the U.S., I came across a short poem and was stunned by the powerful images: What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up Like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore– And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust…

Under Majestic Cranberry Tree

Originally posted on Renard's World:
An unknown French traveler, visiting Russia during summer (there are summers in Russia, Beautiful People!), rested in the shade of a luxuriously leafy crown of a huge tree. Apparently not familiar with Russian flora, he inquired about the name of the tree. “Klyukva – cranberry,”  – with a straight…

The Real Treasure of the Caribbean: Haiti, Part 2. Fried Accra.

Slavery started in Haiti with the arrival of Columbus. Met with friendliness, welcoming gifts, and delicious local fritters called Accra or Akra, he described the native Arawak Taino people as “tractable, and easily led; they could be made to grow crops and build cities” (Mellzer, Slavery: A World History, 1971). And the gentle, helpful natives…