Dracula and Klyotzki Dumplings

It looks like my Monster cookies were not scary enough for you, Beautiful People. Let me introduce you to some truly terrible real monsters who have become legendary.

Count Dracula really existed. He was born in Transylvania in fifteenth century and ruled the province called Wallachia. His name was Vlad III, and his last name was Dracul, which means Dragon in Romanian. He came by this name honestly, inheriting it from his father, Vlad II, who had joined a secret Order of the Dragon and assumed the name. In modern Romanian, dracul also means devil, and this translation went a long way towards inspiring many vampire legends. Wait, but the Bram Stoker’s blood drinker is Count Dracula, whereas our man is Prince Dracul. Granted, he also wasn’t a very savory character, dispatching his enemies with extreme cruelty. His favorite execution method was impaling, for which he earned a nickname Tepes – the Impaler. Not a nice guy by any stretch of imagination, but a blood drinker? No. Anyway, what about the missing letter?

200px-elizabeth_bathory_portrait

We find the letter, together with the answer, when we look at this beautiful young lady, Elizabeth Bathory, a serial killer who was called The Blood Countess, or Countess Dracula. It’s very simple: in Romanian, dracul is a male devil, and dracula is female. Since Elizabeth Arden and Estee Lauder had not started their businesses yet, Countess Elizabeth devised an innovative method to preserve her youth and beauty; she bathed in the blood of virgins (or so the stories claim). Perhaps she did, or maybe she didn’t, but the fact is that she was brought to trial and convicted of causing more than 600 deaths of young women, presumably virgins. The various atrocities she committed were indisputably proven by physical evidence. She lived more than a century after Vlad the Impaler’s death, but in the same region of Europe, so apparently the two monsters merged into one legend.

kleck_gr_sm_old

What do these bloody old legends have to do with a delicious soup? The Countess Dracula’s father, King Stefan Bathory, ruled, among many large and small provinces, a feudal stronghold called Klecia, today a city of Klyotzk (Klezk) in Belorus. Even though similar easy, cheap, and filling dumplings exist in practically all cuisines throughout the world, Belorussians proudly claim the Klyotzkian origins of their version.

All you need is flour and water, and maybe a bit of oil, to soften the dough. However, all cook books recommend to use milk instead of water, and some suggest to include eggs as well. I am making a traditional peasant recipe, without eggs, and instead of dairy milk, I use soy milk. It does make a difference, so that even with whole wheat flour, my Klyotzki come out light and fluffy. If you prefer not to use soy, any milk substitute of your choice will do. Baking powder and a pinch of salt also help.

Mix all this together, add a little water if the dough is too thick, and refrigerate it for about ten minutes. Meanwhile, heat up your soup. Which soup? Whatever you have. Klyotzki will be a welcome addition to any soup, as long as it is hot. I usually drop them either into my  Everything Soup (for recipe, click here) or my Summer Cabbage Soup (for recipe, click here), but trust me, any soup will only benefit from these tasty morsels! Bring it to boil and drop little pieces of dough into your boiling soup. You can use a teaspoon or just pinch little bits off. Simmer for about five minutes, and it’s ready – forget about all the legendary monsters and go get a spoon!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons soy milk, or any non-dairy milk of your choice
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon water, if needed

PROCEDURE

  • Mix all ingredients until well blended for soft dough.
  • Refrigerate for 10 minutes.
  • Drop small portions into boiling soup, cook on medium for 5 minutes.
  • Alternatively, cook in boiling water and serve with any sauce as side dish.

Enjoy!

54 Comments Add yours

  1. ShiraDest says:

    “What do these bloody old legends have to do with a delicious soup?”
    Nice!
    And the soup looks great!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you, darling! Go make some!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. A delicious link 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you very much, Derrick.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Mmmm. Dumplings! 😋🍂😍

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, dear Gail! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Love a good story! Oh, and a good bowl of soup.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Dorothy; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear Edward!

      Like

  5. Very interesting characters,in this posting. Have i told you, some of my ancestors are from Hungary, had lived a longer time in Romania (Wallachia). 😉 Indeed, the soup sounds delicious. Thank you for sharing, Dolly! Stay save, and enjoy life. Michael

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ooooh, you have Dracula ancestry in your BLOOD, Michael! Does it transmit through internet? I am scared! LOL
      Have a wonderful day, dear friend!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. The perfect comfort food! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Ronit. BTW, I just made perch using your shrimp in butter, lemon, and parsley sauce. I used Smart Balance, and it came out delicious. Thank you for the recipe!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for the update. Glad to know! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You are very welcome, dear Ronit.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. mel says:

    Sounds scary but looks delicious! Perfect for Halloween!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mel!

      Like

  8. I love the history lessons that accompany your recipes, this one sounds wonderful, I love dumplings of all kinds!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for a lovely comment, dear Tiffany; these are the easiest dumplings to make, and they are delicious too,

      Like

  9. chattykerry says:

    Lovely tale and recipe, Dolly. My old boss was a beautiful woman from Transylvania with white skin and long black hair. When she had her DNA analyzed, she was mostly Jewish.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You know what it sounds like, right? A beautiful Transylvanian woman with white skin and long black hair – are you sure she had the Jewish DNA rather than Count Dracula’s?
      Thank you so much, dear Kerry!

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Okay, i have to try home made dumplings once, if they are this easy!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. They really are, dear Mimi – good luck!

      Like

  11. cookingflip says:

    Thank you for this recipe, Dolly. I sometimes run out of suet for dumplings, so this would be a v. good alternative.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have never used suet as it is a non-kosher part of animals. I hope you like it made my way, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cookingflip says:

        I’m certain I’d love this, Dolly (I have saved it already and filed it in my recipes folder). Suet is also expensive, so I’m happy to discover your version of dumplings (by the way, vegetarian suet is common in the supermarket shelves here in the UK–I wish you’d have them as well in the US). Wishing you a lovely day ☀

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for a suggestion, darling; however, not everything vegetarian is also kosher (there are some other issues involved, so they must be certified kosher).
        Have a wonderful week!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. cookingflip says:

        Thank you for the info, Dolly–I’m always pleased to be educated about these things. Very much appreciated. Cheers!
        (I made your stewed pear with rum/honey/cinnamon the other week, by the way–very, very good! Thank you! 🍐😋👍)

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I am pleased you have enjoyed my pear recipe, darling! You are most welcome, and I am always happy to help.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Espirational says:

    I love your stories and your recipes. Will have to try the dumplings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear friend; I am so glad you like it!

      Like

  13. 15andmeowing says:

    I always enjoy the stories with your recipes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, darling!

      Like

  14. Blood curdling! Those klyotzki sound alot like spaetzle. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Aaratrika says:

    As always, amazing writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, darling; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. K E Garland says:

    Of course, the man gets all the credit for being devilish lol I blame the patriarchy. I also think it would be a nice movie to tell Elizabeth Dracula’s story 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are too funny, Dr Kathy! You want women to get credit for being evil!
      Agree about the movie. There was a woman like that in Russia during Catherine the Great’s times (in fact, she shared a lover with Catherine) who bathed in the blood of virgins to stay young, and there is a serial about her, but it’s in Russian. She does get full credit.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. K E Garland says:

        LOL Well, that makes me feel a little better.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. What? A few more hundreds of innocent girls got slaughtered, and it makes you feel better? Shame on you, you feminist you!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. K E Garland says:

        LOL You have made me laugh today Dolly!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I am glad, dear Dr Kathy!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear friend.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. The good count impaled tens of thousands of Muslims after he grew tired of them raping and murdering his subjects. Not such a bad guy after all.

    Liked by 1 person

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