Tzimmes mit Fasoles – Red Beans with Honey

One of my family legends (every family has at least one, doesn’t it?) places the origins of my grandmother’s side in Cadiz, Spain, up until the year 1478, when part of the family managed to escape in the nick of time, before the Expulsion Edict and the fires of Inquisition. Whether this claim has any veracity to it or not, many of our family recipes have a decidedly Sephardic (Spanish Jewish) flavor. This one also has a Sephardic history and etimology. Enjoy it, Beautiful People, and have a sweet and joyous year!

via Tzimmes mit Fasoles – Red Beans with Honey

29 Comments Add yours

  1. What a lovely post! I enjoyed the touch of family history and how you related it to the recipe. (Which also sounds delicious!) Hugs.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, dear Teagan!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. True or not, fascinating history or myth

    Liked by 4 people

    1. There is more to it, Derrick. I have a curious birthmark – a black triangle on the iris of my left eye. So did my grandmother, may she rest in peace. According to the same legend, so had every other generation of women in her side of the family. In Middle Ages, every mark on the left side was considered “sinister” – evil, from Latin “sinistra” – left. It was especially dangerous for women, and especially if the mark was on the eye – the “evil eye.” Consequently, one of my ancestresses was burned at stake as a witch in 1478 in Cadiz, prompting the rest of the family to run. I’ve always taken it with a grain of salt, but I’d love to go to Cadiz and research Jewish community records. I am a curious cat!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I’d certainly want to do that 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I love how you put a little history of the food in it. I do that too. I think it helps a lot, especially when cooking something you are unfamiliar with. Thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I know you do, and I love your blog! Thank you so much for stopping by and for a lovely comment!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are very welcome. i love your blog too. I always learn something new when I read it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You made my day with this comment!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. YAY!!!!! I hope you have another great day today too. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

      4. So far, so good, darling, and I wish you the same!

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Good to hear, and thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Joëlle says:

    A few days ago, my husband and I listened to a podcast about the history of Sephardic Jews. Not only was it very interesting, but we also got to hear beautiful musical pieces from different times and places. Did your family go to Turkey from Spain, Dolly?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. The Turkish “safe haven” opened about 60 – 70 years later, during the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent who welcomed Jewish refugees from Spain and Portugal and helped them settle in Salonika which was part of the Ottoman Empire. The deal was brokered by Dona Gracia Nasi Mendes. I have mentioned this incredible lady here https://koolkosherkitchen.wordpress.com/2017/05/08/preserving-jews-and-all-sorts-of-fish-escabeche.
      So no, my family went to Germany and gradually made its way to the part of Poland which is now Ukraine.
      I thank you and your husband for your interest, and of course, thank you so much for stopping by and commenting, dear Joelle!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Joëlle says:

        I try to embrace all cultures, Dolly, how could I not, given the variety of backgrounds, and religions, in the family my husband and I started when we got married… It’s all about love!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh yes, about love! Thank you, dear Joelle!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. spearfruit says:

    Looks good Dolly. Would be a good change a d a healthy alternative for me as a dessert instead of cake, cookies and ice cream of which I eat plenty to satisfy my craving for sweets.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Certainly, and full of healthy protein as well, as oppose to those cookies and cakes that are pure carbs.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I love linguistic stories, don’t you?

      Like

      1. gresshoppe says:

        Yes, me too:))

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Thank you, and really the combination of recipe and history also shows how educational cooking can be. Michael.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Michael. I maintain that education goes down easier with food. That’s why I have incorporated little cooking activities into my Lasting Joy Club monthly get-togethers.

      Like

  7. nluxcy says:

    https://wp.me/pa8Ewv-33
    Tangy sweet corn recipe
    Quick and easy recipe

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for a link, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. A nice combination of ingredients here. The moral. of the story and dish is “health consciousness”.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much, darling; I am glad you like it!

      Like

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