Of Hats, Pockets, Ears, and Hidden Messages

These pastries are called Hamantaschen. We can no more imagine the holiday of Purim without them than without the graggers – noisemakers gleefully shaken by children and adults alike to drown the name of the evil villain Haman.

That’s a story of Purim in a nutshell. Once again, the Jewish people, marked for wholesale slaughter, were saved through the good offices of the beautiful and pious Queen Esther and her uncle, the wise and righteous Mordechai. To commemorate this event, we read (or at least listen to) Megillas Esther (the Scroll of Esther) where the entire story is recorded in minute details. Every time when Haman (may his memory be erased forever) is mentioned, we make all kinds of noises, and not necessarily by using traditional graggers that look like this:

purim-gragger

…but also anything that makes loud noises. I play castanets. A friend of mine, a very reserved lady during the rest of the year, imitates various animal sounds. You can stomp your feet, clap your hands, and generally make a total fool of yourself, but make sure you produce ear-splitting noise!

Talking about ears, in Hebrew these triangular pastries are called oznei Haman – Haman’s ears. How did that happen? I grew up with a story that, after Haman and his ten sons had been hanged, their ears were cut off, to be sent to different cities as proof of victory. Really? Is that was Jews did – cut off the dead guys’ ears, neatly packaged them in ice, and shipped them around by UPS?

Of course not! Like many other legends, this one was born of jumbled together bits and pieces of information. One of the most venerated – and the most delightful! – Purim traditions is Purim shpil, a play or a skit where the Purim story is retold in a funny way, just as you saw in the video. It is in a sixteenth century Purim shpil, performed in Italy, that the sweet treats were called oznei Haman for the first time, and the joke morphed into a mutilation legend and gradually spread throughout Europe. Actually, little stuffed dumplings have been called “ears” in Italy way before this unfortunate jest, as described by Rabbi Don Yitzchak Abarbanel.

Fine, no cutting ears off, so what are hamantaschen? Why are they so important that we have to spend hours fashioning those triangles and hiding poppy seed filling inside? Can’t we just bake cookies and be done with it? Obviously, the first part of the word looks like the name Haman. In the video, he is wearing a tricorn, to demonstrate yet another meaning of the pastries’ shape – Haman’s hat. However, tricorns had definitely not been fashionable in ancient Persia about 2400 years ago.  Most likely, the vicious Jew-hater looked like this:

There is one telling detail in the story: even though Haman offers the king a fantastic amount of money, a tremendous fortune, in return for the death sentence for all Jews, he stands to gain it all back plus a lot more by confiscating their properties and belongings. Remember what the Nazis did? Same idea. The guy is investing his entire fortune in order to line his pockets with a much larger one. In Yiddish, tasch means pocket, so it’s not ears or hats, but Haman’s pockets we are baking every year, pockets stuffed with Jewish gold drenched in Jewish blood.  Why would we want to do that?

Even though today hamantaschen are made with all kinds of different fillings, the traditional one is poppy seed – mohn, in Yiddish, which makes the pastries “poppy-seed-filled pockets.” Now, what’s so special about poppy seed? The Talmud explains that, since Queen Esther did not disclose her identity (incidentally, one of the Purim customs is wearing masks), she couldn’t have kosher food prepared for her, but neither would she eat non-kosher food. Consequently, the poor Queen became the first raw foodie in history, subsisting solely on seeds and nuts. No wonder she had such a slender figure!

However, the word tash in Hebrew means “weaken” – we believe that G-d always weakens our enemies, as He weakened Haman and his entire evil family. The three corners of the pastry remind us of a pivotal moment when Haman recognized the spiritual strength of our forefathers, Avrohom, Yitzchok, and Yaakov. This is when he weakened, and this is when he lost. Oh, but only a small part of the Jews lived in Shushan, the capital. The rest were dispersed throughout Persia. Lacking Internet and cellphones, they didn’t even know that they had been in danger! “They are going to kill us all? No way! Why? They’ll probably just relocate us to a safe place…” Sounds familiar? Remember the Nazis?

Prudent Mordechai kept sending them messages hidden… in cookies. He must’ve figured that sweet pastries will make a scary message more palatable. But there is a deeper significance to this “hidden sweetness”: G-d is not mentioned in Megillas Esther. He operates “behind the scenes,” so to speak, but the sweetness of the filling reminds us that He is ever present for all His children (www.chabad.org).

Hmntsn 1.jpg

These are soft and fluffy hamentaschen, rather than the cookie dough ones you see everywhere on Purim. This is how my grandmother made them, this is how my father loved them, and this is how I made them for him every year, after we lost my mother. I have not figured out a way to make them healthy by substituting a different flour, a sugar substitute, or a vegan egg. Once a year, on Purim, I can go all out and indulge!

Hmntsn 2.jpg

This is time consuming, like every yeast dough, but actually pretty easy. In one bowl, mix all the dry ingredients: flour, sugar (there isn’t really all that much sugar!), a little bit of salt, and active dry yeast. In another bowl, whisk an egg with olive oil and warm water. Then gradually add dry ingredients to wet, gently folding them in until fully incorporated.

Hmntsn 3.jpg

Turn the dough over to a floured board or working surface and kneed for about five minutes. Take a large bowl, spray it lightly with oil, place your dough into it, and spray some more oil on top. Now cover it and let it rest until it doubles in size. It should take about an hour, depending on the temperature in your kitchen. Meanwhile, I am sure you have things to do!

Hmntsn 4.jpg

Once your dough is ready, turn it out on a floured surface and punch it down. Divide it into four parts, and work with one part at a time. Using a rolling pin, roll it out to about 1/4 inch (3/4 cm) thickness. Get your filling ready. I made mine with chocolate – are you surprised?

Hmntsn 5.jpg

Use a cookie cutter, a glass, or a measuring cup to cut circles. One fourth of the total dough should give you seven to eight circles. Place a teaspoon of filling ( in my case, chocolate chunks, but you can use chips, or you can use any filling you like!) in the center of each circle and seal them completely as triangles. Place them on a lightly misted with oil cookie sheet seam down, giving them a little space to grow, cover them, and again let them rest until they double in size. That should take another hour or so.  If you don’t have anything to do, which I doubt, go write a post!

Hmntsn 6.jpg

My hamentaschen look nice and plump, so it’s time for them to go get baked. Before they do, though,  whisk an egg with some water and paint them with egg wash. I was really planning to sprinkle them with poppy seed, as the tradition demands, but couldn’t find poppy seed anywhere. I opted for sesame seeds instead -as long as I have seeds, I am still honoring Queen Esther’s staunchness. In they go for about thirty minutes.

Hmntsn 7

They come out nice and plump, but to abide by my own Rule of Dessert #2 – The more chocolate, the better! – I will drizzle some chocolate syrup on top. Purim is a fun holiday, a masquerade, and I will be wearing my Venetian cat mask. This is not the real Megillas Esther, of course, but a gift box filled with hamantaschen, candy, and other treats. I am preparing several of them to give out to friends and family, and the little gragger next to it is a part of the gift set. It is commanded to send these gifts, “filled with portions of foods” on Purim, to make sure everyone is in a festive mood. We wish each other, and everybody else, to rejoice  – happy holiday!

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 oz package active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 1 large egg plus 1 more for egg wash
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 8 oz chocolate chunks or chips or your choice (optional – any other filling)
  • Poppy or sesame seeds to sprinkle
  • Optional chocolate syrup to drizzle

PROCEDURE

  • Mix flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in bowl. Whisk egg with oil in another bowl, add water while  whisking.
  • Add dry ingredients to wet by two tablespoons at a time, until they are well incorporated. Turn dough over to floured surface, kneed for 5 minutes. Place dough into large bowl misted with oil, spray oil on top. Cover, let rest until doubled in size.
  • Turn dough over to floured surface, divide into 4 parts. Use rolling pin to roll each quarter to 1/4 inch (less than 1 cm) thickness. Use cookie cutter or glass to cut circles. Place filling in the center of each circle, fold and seal sides to form triangle.
  • Lightly mist cookie sheet with oil, place pastries seam down leaving 1/2 inch spaces between them. Cover, let rest until doubled in size, about an hour.
  • Preheat oven to 350 F. Whisk egg with 1 tablespoon of water, paint pastries with egg wash. Sprinkle with seeds.
  • Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown.
  • Cool on rack, drizzle with chocolate syrup before serving.

Enjoy!

 

 

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151 Comments Add yours

  1. Fascinating history and delicious recipe! 🙂 x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Samantha!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging!

      Like

  2. Interesting post Dolly and I’m in for trying these 😀
    Can I freeze them, if there are more than I can use fast? Of course before I add chocolate upstairs.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, dear Irene! Yes, you can freeze them, but when you defrost, it’s better to wrap them in foil and put them in the oven for a few minutes.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Thank you, Dolly 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Joëlle says:

    Thank you for the story, so much culture behind these pastries, which look delicious and sound doable even with gluten-free flour 😊. And I recognized your chocolate chunks, I saw the same ones in my daughter’s cabinets last fall!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you! Yes, they should be just as plump and fluffy made with gluten-free flour. For us it would make a difference since gluten-free flours do not contain grains, and for Shabbos and holiday purposes, we must have grain-based breads and pastries. Your daughter seems to know her way around kosher groceries! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Joëlle says:

        Would buckwheat and teff qualify as grains? Just curious, and I know you are always so nice, and patient, as to answer my many questions!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. No, unfortunately both of them are seeds, even if they are ground into flour. Oats do, though, but I my husband is not so fund of oats. We do fine with spelt, though. For his purposes, spelt is ideal.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. spearfruit says:

    Very interesting information Dolly, I always enjoy the history you provide. And I also agree with you – The more chocolate, the better! Happy day my friend. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Terry! You too have a lovely day!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. feistyfroggy says:

    Love this post! I live in an area where there aren’t many Jewish people around. I never realized how festive Purim is or the traditions that surround it. I did know what it celebrated–just not the details of how it’s done.

    The hamantaschen look wonderful! And yes, I actually was quite surprised you used chocolate in them!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much! Chocolate-filled and chocolate dipped hamantaschen are sold everywhere nowadays, but they are the cookie dough kinds, not yeast dough. And why not? So I tried it a couple of years ago, and everybody loved it.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. lghiggins says:

    I love all the details of the traditions of Purim. Your hamentaschen looks delicious. I was privileged to visit Israel for a week when my husband had to go there as a consultant. One of my favorite souvenirs from Israel is a gragger made in what I assume is traditional fashion (animal skins, and you twist it in your palms). Esther was a woman of God and also a woman of great courage and intelligence.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you for your kind words. Yes, the one you twist in your palms is one of the traditional types, but not very popular in Eastern Europe. So you have a rare one! Esther was very exceptional in every way, but it’s because of that we are fasting today. On the other hand, I think that just showed her intelligence once again because, starting on Saturday night, it will be just one endless party-hopping for 24 hours!

      Liked by 3 people

  7. lghiggins says:

    Reblogged this on education pathways and commented:
    I read so many fascinating tales and review them in my blog, but probably none outshine the real story of Esther found in the Bible. Here my blogging friend Dolly (KOOLKOSHERKITCHEN) shares the original tale along with traditions that have developed and are part of the celebration of Purim. Don’t miss the funny video and delicious recipe she shares as well.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging and for your beautiful comment.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Looks great! חג שמח! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Same to you – have a great time!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! They LOOKED – past tense. They are gone…

      Liked by 1 person

  9. randyjw says:

    I think this is my favorite post of yours. Happy Purim! The hamantaschen look delicious! I like the yeast dough idea!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you – so you did see it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. randyjw says:

        Eventually. Saw, salivated, and thought of a nice cup of coffee to go with that…

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Well, yeah, there was a lot of vodka to go with that in shul, but I don’t drink vodka, so I got to watch guys making fools of themselves…

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Balvinder says:

    These look absolutely delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, dear Bal!

      Like

  11. Ginger says:

    You write great posts but I must admit I resent your stunning photos … I’m not a good cook and they make me feel so hungry! Any chance of posting a ‘taste’ so I know they are genuine? lol

    Liked by 3 people

    1. LOL I am sorry, dear! I wish I knew how to post a taste! As it is, I take pictures with my phone, and sometimes my cat tries to help by bumping my elbow, so I have no idea what’s so “stunning” about them!

      Like

      1. Ginger says:

        They look mouth watering yummy! No hint of phone or cat, just gets the gastric juices flowing … maybe I could visit sometime and lick the bowls? lol

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Do come over and visit! Everyone is welcome in my kitchen!

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Ginger says:

        Thank you but sorry you’re on the wrong continent! I will just dream about it …

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Oh I am sorry about the wrong continent! How did I end up on the wrong continent – what a mix up! LOL

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Ginger says:

        lol not sure which continent is the ‘wrong’ one … we are not on the same continent and I’m not a good swimmer!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. I love this! I also just learned about why they are called hamentashen this year. Happy Purim!🎭

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I hope you had lots of fun, and I expect pictures of the girls on your blog, please!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Rachel has been in the hospital so things have been even more hectic. I have been a mommy on the warpath. But, she is getting better. We went to see my sister and her brood. It was so nice!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. What’s with Rachel?

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Very complicated and most upsetting. She had an allergic reaction to her medication. It was very serious and the poor thing has been very sick. These things are not a joke. 😰

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I am so sorry to hear that! Are they treating her? Is she getting better?

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Finally, I am seeing improvement. This has been awful!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Nebach – the poor child!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Yes. She has not been happy.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Is she back home or still in the hospital?

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Refuach sheleima! Her name is Raizel bas?

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Masha Leiba (now you know why everyone calls me Carol). But, B”H, she is coming home today 😍

        Liked by 1 person

      11. I am so glad to hear that, but I’ll say Tehillim for her today just the same.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. The video was very clever – and, as always, I learned much I did not know from your post. Glad to read in one of your comments that there is a gluten free grain acceptable for those with Celiac Sprue, who can’t have even a tiny bit of gluten even once in a while without getting very sick.

    Love the mask – what do you wear with it? I’d love to see a video of your celebration – or be a fly on the wall. Your traditions always sound like so much fun, even though I realize they are meant to teach deeper lessons.
    xx,
    mgh
    (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
    ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
    “It takes a village to educate a world!”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your wonderful comment! Actually, everybody who wasn’t dancing at the moment had a phone in their hands taking pictures and videos; everybody but myself. I was busy admiring little kids running around in cute costumes. I usually wear a black velvet dress with this mask – I am a black cat, you know!
      As to Celiac and other disorders and’or allergies, we have a very specific law which states that everything is acceptable if it done for the purpose of maintaining health or saving a life. If a doctor prescribes porky pig, we’ll eat porky pig.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Judaism has always been a practical religion, or so it was explained to me.

        To visit a colleague, I once took a 2-hour bus ride from NYC to Doylestown, PA and was seated next to a female rabbi, wonderfully patient about answering some of my many questions. Learning still more from you – with gratitude.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I am glad you feel this way; it makes me feel needed. We don’t consider Judaism a religion, other than for filling out official paperwork. Anyone born of a Jewish mother is Jewish, observant or not. If anything, its genetics, not a religion. It is a person’s choice whether to be observant and to maintain a lifestyle structured upon the laws of the Torah and Talmud. The Nazis, may their memory be erased forever, killed Jews regardless of their level of observance or non-observance. Being observant simply means doing certain things and abstaining from doing certain other things. Of course it is totally practical!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. My bus companion explained that faith is a PRACTICE – and that Jewish law outlines “the rules” to make it easier for many to keep practicing.

        As for needed – never more than now, Dolly. We are hardwired to be cautious of “strangers” – but hate is a choice. It’s difficult to hate an entire community when one is in relationship with an actual human being or several from that “tribe” — especially once you’ve, metaphorically, eaten at their table.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 2 people

      4. You are welcome to eat at my table any time, and not only metaphorically!
        I am quite sure that some terms are lost in translation, and that’s why we call it observance, rather than faith. However, she was absolutely correct in that observance is a practice, i.e. a set of practical rules. I am not so sure about it being easy; it depends on a person. I find it not only easy, but essential and enjoyable not to touch phones and computers on Shabbos, while some find it a harsh restriction. The same applies to kosher food and other so-called restrictions. The law clarifies minute details of the observances for those who are observant.
        I thank you for your concept of being needed: I have not looked at it this way. If you’ve read my earlier posts, you know that I started this blog as therapy for myself, to cope with the loss of my father. I realize that my posts are deemed entertaining and my recipes really are good (my guests like my food!), but had I not started it, the world would’ve had one blog less, and there are myriads of them, brilliant, entertaining, informational (like yours, for instance). It is important for me to be needed, and you have given it to me – that’s invaluable!

        Liked by 1 person

      5. “Observance” makes sense – and thanks for the acknowledgment, but surely you have noticed that your own blog is unique in several ways.

        Your posts certainly are entertaining, Dolly, but they also spread cultural awareness and understanding, and THAT’s invaluable, especially with what’s happening since the last election cycle.

        To rephrase what I said in a comment on Beth’s blog: (bethanybyrnes dot com)
        ~~~~~~~~~
        I don’t know what’s wrong with the current administration – what produced an almost total lack of empathy.

        My belief is that those now running the show have never been exposed to diversity of any sort – one of the problems with many private schools and the kids of the wealthy who are educated there. And now they gather with their rich, primarily white buddies and they all agree, so they must be right – or so they believe, I’m fairly certain.

        Or perhaps they have only resided in wealthy nabes with similar demographics?

        Nonetheless, my own public High School was over-stocked with upper-upper middle class kids who lived in wealthy nabes nearby (as did I, but not because my family was wealthy), yet I didn’t turn out empathy averse, so perhaps parenting values were missing in the household’s of those in power today?

        Who knows, but the more diversity we encounter on the blogs, the kinder our society will be overall. That is my prayer anyway. And you are certainly the essence of kindness.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Why thank you! on the topic of election and diversity, I am sure you are aware that Ivanka Trump Kushner is an observant, practicing convert to Judaism. That doesn’t seem to faze anybody. But I don’t want to go into politics, not in a public forum.
        Thank you for your kind words, they really mean a lot to me!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I was aware – but NY is probably more Jewish-friendly than practically anywhere else in America (except maybe Boca) 🙂 — and Ivanka is the favorite child. Don’t know how they might have reacted had she wanted to marry someone muslim – or of Mexican descent.

        I agree, however, that I don’t want to turn *either* of our blogs into political discussions online.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Right! When you come visit me, we’ll sit in my courtyard with dessert drinks and yell our fool heads off, the way we do with one of my best friends. Actually, I don’t yell. Neither does her husband. She and my husband (the two ADHD heroes) yell at each other, while her husband and I laugh our heads off.

        Liked by 2 people

      9. I don’t yell either, at least not intentionally. Sometimes my voice gets louder for emphasis, but I don’t think I’ve every been told to stop yelling. I’m more like my puppy, who cowers when things get really loud. A courtyard discussion sounds perfect.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      10. I tend to lower my voice for emphasis; this way people make an effort to listen. Teacher tricks!

        Liked by 1 person

      11. Teacher HABIT – one I have hardly ever had enough repetitions to install, since most of my connections have been virtual. Very effective, however, when I remember to use it live. Since I avoid arguments, for the most part, I don’t need to practice very often.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      12. Neither do I, not any more, at least.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. kelleysdiy says:

    What a wonderful post!!! I always tell myself that I’m never too old to learn something new everyday!I learned so much about the Jewish faith from you! Thank you so much!!!! Happy Purim!!!! Love the chocolate!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! And I always say that learning something new all the time keeps us young!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. kelleysdiy says:

        It does…it really does! I am so excited about my next post…THRILLED!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Can’t wait to see it!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. kelleysdiy says:

        Did you check it out yet??????

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I did – fantastic! And so in style with your house.

        Like

      5. kelleysdiy says:

        Did you check it out yet?????

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Uttley says:

    They tried to kill us! We’re still here! Let’s eat!
    What a great post.
    Stopped by to hip you to the new prezi, since you are like the only person who’s mentioned digging them: http://prezi.com/97uljuynj8jn/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
    Cheers!
    -Utt

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am glad you know this old joke. Always love your prezi’s – thanks!

      Like

  16. That was so entertaining, Dolly 😀 A morning well begun for me. The legend of Haman and chocolate pockets of goodness. Also, I love your stated rules. So, bring on the chocolate 😉 x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear! More chocolate coming up soon! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much for reblogging.

      Like

  17. Kash Pals says:

    As always an interesting read with the recipe. Happy Purim to you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Hannah Witt says:

    I am soo sorry that I did not see your post on Hammantashen as I spent days looking for an easy recipe. I was determined to make my own. Unfortunately my husband only eats the mon ones and me cheese (cream cheese) which I have since come to believe is more South African. To cut a long story, I got a short crust pastry from my Uncle who had a very big chain of confectionery shops in Israel and this didn’t work (my short crust for the Hammantashen ) so back on the phone to Israel and decided to make a yeast dough . They came out HUGE as I had no idea how to do the mon (too sweet and buttery) and I filled too much. A huge job and easier to just buy 😭🙈

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Hannah, a belated Happy Purim to you and yours! Next time when you are looking for a recipe, just drop me a line. Chances are, I might be able to help! People have done that in the past, I was always able to come through. Are you doing “gebrokhts” or “non-gebrokhts” for Pesach?

      Like

  19. oldpoet56 says:

    Great story, I enjoyed it even though I know the story well it was good to hear/read it again. My wife did not know the story of Purim so I told her the story and she really liked it. I am going to reblog this story for you for the readers who also don’t know the story. Also, I have never had or even heard of your tasty treats but I told my wife about them so maybe someday soon I might delight my tastebuds.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so glad you liked it! By the way, have you seen this http://www.jewishpress.com/news/global/europe/uk/beware-of-jews-street-sign-posted-in-london? It seems there is no safe place for us in the world any more. We need another Esther!

      Like

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging.

      Like

  20. Growing up in Brooklyn, I have eaten my fair share of these sweet petites but I never knew the story behind them! Thank you so much for the lesson! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My pleasure, dear Mel, but I’ll bet you’ve never had the soft fluffy ones like mine, but only American style, with cookie dough.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You might be correct! I grew up in traditional jewish neighborhood, though. In my neighborhood some of the neighbor’s porches doubled as Sukkah (sp) during the holiday. It is so funny the things you remember from childhood – these pastries brought back a lot of memories. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am glad you had a nice warm feeling!

        Liked by 1 person

  21. sweets67 says:

    I can taste your hamantaschen. We made them as kids. Had to always put prune butter in the middle.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Prune butter is a substitute for poppy seed because it is also black, and it is supposed to symbolize the black heart of Haman. I’ve always had a question about it: if seeds symbolize Esther, how could they symbolize Haman at the same time? But as long as we enjoy them, that’s what counts!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. sweets67 says:

        Hmm. Maybe it was poppy seed, not sure. We also used apricot. Good question about Esther. I am with you, as long as we enjoy eating them, that is what counts. Thanks for an awesome blog.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you so much, dear!

        Like

  22. While I am a dreadful cook, I loved this post. As an ex-New Yorker, I’ve always had Jewish friends. None though have ever explained the symbolism behind hamantaschen. Thank you for a sweet and informative lesson! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for a wonderful comment; it means a lot to me!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. munchkinontheroad says:

    Reblogged this on On the Road Cooking and commented:
    Great article about the fun-filled holiday of Purim and my favorite treat in the Purim Basket, Hamantaschen…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging and for your kind comment! By the way, I call my middle granddaughter Munchkin-girl.

      Like

  24. Osyth says:

    This is why, when I was 14 I took three buses and visited the local Rabbi to ask if I could convert to Judaism. I now realise, shame–faced, that it was the food that I was craving rather than the faith. I remain devoted, though unconverted, to both. The food is of course divine as demonstrated by these babies (I’m making them tomorrow, by the way just because I can and because my life will be forever unfulfilled if I don’t try this recipe) and the faith is so full of energy and passion – unashamed celebrations of the highs and the lows. My proudest moment came when my eldest daughter was declared a Jew Angel by her boss when she beat crowds out of her way to stop him eating potted shrimp which he though was gefilte fish in the moodily lit room at an awards ceremony. I am SO happy to have found your site …. let the fun commence!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love your daughter already! She’d probably get along, sparks flying, with my oldest granddaughter (talking about energy and passion). Have you read or watched “Como agua para chocolate”? Any food becomes divine when the main ingredient is love, and I am so happy you are joining the lovely funky crowd in my kitchen!
      If you make my Hamantaschen, please let me know how they come out – enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Osyth says:

        My dear, I am making those babies … they have me writ large on them believe me! My daughter and your grand-daughter sound like a pair which I makes me happy. I actually and really believe that love really IS all we need …. seasoned with laughter it becomes unassailable. I need to find this novel – I’ll be hopping and skipping to the library tomorrow and putting it on order 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You don’t have to rush to the library – here it is https://d3jc3ahdjad7x7.cloudfront.net/GrVYaffz2SBkjQjrteg6KNGZ9ReLHecEnEistj9467ou9osH.pdf
        You can convert it to e-pub for easier reading.
        My granddaughter is 16 and is having fun in France as we speak. How old is your daughter?

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Osyth says:

        I have four daughters … that one is 30, the next is 26 then 24 and my babyest is 21. Thank you for this. I will delight in the book I am certain. Where in France is the Grandie? I can wave!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Nancy at the moment, and where are you?

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Osyth says:

        Right now til July I am 5 hours due South of her in Grenoble but my home is actually in le Massif Central (I like mountains, you may gather).

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I got that – to each his own. Even though I did my share of mountain hiking when I was young, I am a sea girl by birth, upbringing, and inclination.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Osyth says:

        I love the sea and I’m greedy enough to say if I could live in the mountains and see the sea it would be perfect but when I have to choose the mountains win (preferably with lovely lakes to substitute for the lack of ocean 😉)

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Ah, but to see the sea is not enough for me; I have to do things. Conversely, it wasn’t enough for me to admire the mountains from a distance; I had to walk, climb, squeeze into caves, get scratched up by stalactites and stalagmites, and generally explore and discover.You see, when you see the sea, you don’t get to swim with dolphins!

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Osyth says:

        It is, indeed all about feeling in the end 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Here we go: materialism vs idealism, or Existence Precedes Essence. Hegel is saying Hello to us, together with Ludwig Feuerbach.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. Osyth says:

        I hear It!

        Liked by 1 person

      12. So do I, and I am a confirmed existentialist: you eat good food, and it makes your essence good. Of course, good wine doesn’t hurt, either…

        Liked by 1 person

      13. Osyth says:

        An unarguable truth in my opinion….

        Liked by 1 person

      14. I am glad I gathered at least one vote – yours!

        Liked by 1 person

      15. Osyth says:

        Oh I think if you did a ‘straw poll’ you’d find many of us lurking in the long grass 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      16. There is no long grass by the sea; perhaps that’s why I don’t spot them 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      17. Osyth says:

        Oh there is in Britain …. great long swathes of grass on the dunes on the North East coast. Very windy so the grass dances like banks of hula girls, and wildly beautiful 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      18. I believe you. I have never been to Great Britain because the one week of the year when they have decent weather never coincides with my vacation. But perhaps this gives me a hint as to the reason I have quite a number of readers form U.K.

        Liked by 1 person

      19. Osyth says:

        Why do you think I moved away? The weather stinks and if the place gets any more crowded it will sink!

        Liked by 1 person

      20. One mystery solved. And why do you think I moved to South Florida? The weather is perfect all year round, and the ocean is 2 blocks away.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. kelleysdiy says:

    Ohhh, this looks soooo yummy!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Linda! I just came back from my son’s new house, and I am already thinking what I can do with the kiddies that would enhance a huge yard and pool and not raise objections. I’ll scroll through your back posts and see what I can implement.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. kelleysdiy says:

        What are you looking for?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’ll have to think how to describe my daughter-in-law style to you. Maybe I’ll find some images that will convey the idea. She is Moroccan, so whatever it is, it has to be glittery, but classy glittery. Hard to explain – I’ll try to find pictures. And it has to be something that a trio of 4, 6 , and 10-year olds will enjoy making.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. kelleysdiy says:

        You could do the fair jar with gold and silver sequins and glitter.The butterfly mobile…that’s a good one. Instead of paper like I used…you can use gold and silver and a metallic color scrapbook paper,there are so many sparkly papers at the craft stores.. then do the mirrors like I did on mine.That’s glam! If they have a old chandelier, they can add glitz like I did with my chandelier in closet….I know you’ll know it when you see it.
        There are a couple hundred to look through
        …I just looked and I would try Garden, Crafts,Home- decor, trash to treasure…you’ll find something. I like glitz too, not trashy

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Great ideas, thank you. Instead of fairies, I may use birds – I’ll have to think about it. I love the butterfly mobile idea – that sounds simple enough. Moroccan style is gold and silver and glitz, but also beads. I’ll have to scroll through your archives because I remember seeing something you did with beads. Thank you so much for trying to help!

        Liked by 1 person

      5. kelleysdiy says:

        You are so welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. And you are so sweet!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. kelleysdiy says:

        You could go to pinterst and type in Moroccan diy. Good luck honey! Have fun!

        Liked by 1 person

      8. I’ll do that, thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

      9. kelleysdiy says:

        hahaa…something is wrong here…It went to you 3 times…sorry!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      10. That’s ok, the more, the sweeter!

        Liked by 1 person

      11. kelleysdiy says:

        You could try Moroccan DIY on Pinterest! You could get lots of ideas there!

        Liked by 1 person

      12. I will, thank you!

        Liked by 1 person

      13. kelleysdiy says:

        Your welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

      14. kelleysdiy says:

        You are so welcome…try Pinterest then type in Moroccan Style diy…you will find lots of ideas.

        Liked by 1 person

      15. Thank you so much!

        Liked by 1 person

  26. My favorite hamantaschen is with poppy seeds. It’s like tiny dark presents in a delicious treat. ;
    )

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So are mine, and I love the image of “tiny dark presents”!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. A lovely story and a yummy recipe!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much – I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  28. These are very delicious.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, I am glad you like them!

      Like

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