In Praise of Cabbage and Salt

Originally posted on Renard's World:
Confucius and Cato the Elder had three things in common: both of them bequeathed us lots of wise and inspirational quotes, both of them loved cabbage fermented with salt, and both of them had no idea it was called sauerkraut. To be fair to both distinguished ancient dignitaries, during…

Wondering What Life Is For: Broccoslaw

Originally posted on Renard's World:
Zeus was in a quandary. The supreme and most powerful of Ancient Greek Deities, Awesome and Horrible, and a prolific philanderer, he was not a great intellectual. Sadly, he was not a great prophet either, so between coming up with confusing prophecies and being unable to interpret them, he…

Shlissel Challah – a Key to Wisdom

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
Controversy is raging around this tradition, dating back to Middle Ages. Since we have laboriously and thoroughly divested our homes of all leavened bread in order to celebrate Passover, as we are commanded, Jewish women are faced with a task of baking the first challahs of the year. So we get…

Light the Bonfire of Love with Chocolate Logs!

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
Happy Mother’s Day, Beautiful People! Our sages said, “Who is wise? One who learns from every person” (Ethics of Our Fathers, 4:1). The first person in our lives we have a chance to learn from is MOTHER. From her we learn kindness, caring, and most importantly, unconditional love. Sometimes, it’s not a…

Hello, Beautiful People!

Today, when I transitioned from the kitchen to my computer (this is a Covid 19 jargon, Beautiful People; we don’t move – we transition), I found this: Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com! You registered on WordPress.com 4 years ago. Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging. It took me back to this day four years…

Chinese Cabbage, Japanese Cat, and a “Frenly” Family Store

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
Contrary to a popular belief, the ubiquitous Chinese fortune cat is actually Japanese. There are several legends about it, but most agree that it first made its friendly appearance around 17th – 18th century, when Tokyo was called Edo. A samurai was once caught in a rainstorm. Finding shelter under a…

Lightly Touch Your Heart with Spring Rolls

Originally posted on Renard's World:
Way back around fourth century, many battles were fought in China, some of them won and some lost. With that many battles, you’d have to have a whole lot of generals. Is it any wonder, then, that the names of some army commanders got – ummm – lost? That’s…

Classics Also Quarrel: Russian Pot Pie

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
The rich also cry, as we all know. It is less known, however, that the classics also quarrel. We tend to perceive them as larger than life, rather not susceptible to flaws and frailties  of us, ordinary humans.  Take, for example, Leo Tolstoy, “the greatest apostle of non-violence that the present…

Secret Mango Flower Pie

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
Flowers are not only pretty; they have meanings.  The language of flowers, sometimes called floriography, has been used throughout the ages to express messages of love, longing, happiness, desire, pity, and sometimes even suspicion and sarcasm. Although the book Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh elaborates mainly on – ahem! -elaborate…

Of Hats, Pockets, Ears, and Hidden Messages

Originally posted on koolkosherkitchen:
These pastries are called Hamantaschen. We can no more imagine the holiday of Purim without them than without the graggers – noisemakers gleefully shaken by children and adults alike to drown the name of the evil villain Haman. That’s a story of Purim in a nutshell. Once again, the Jewish people, marked for wholesale…