Pesach on the Boat

Misconceptions abound regarding all Jewish holidays, yet none so widespread as those concerning Pesach (Passover). Some think that Pesach is a two-day holiday, while anyone who has been to Israel is certain that it is only one day. Others believe that it actually consists of two holidays, two days each, with a few days in the interim. Still others have heard that the holiday lasts for a week, and I have heard comments about Jews being lucky, having an extra vacation for a whole week. The latter opinion is actually close to the truth. The holiday of Passover lasts for eight (in Israel seven) days, as we are commanded, “For seven days, you shall eat unleavened bread” (Exodus 12:15); however, only on the first two days we abstain from all work as we do on major holidays decreed by the Torah. It is further commanded that “You shall eat unleavened bread for six days and on the seventh day there shall be a convocation” (Exodus 12:18), so the last two days are also considered holiday days, with all the rules appertaining. The four days in the middle, however, while we still eat matzah (unleavened bread), we are free to go to work, drive, use computers and cell phones, and – hooray! – sail.

“The city I see in my dreams, my dearest city by the Black Sea, ” sings the famous Estonian tenor Georg Ots, “Odessa, my sunny city.

We set sail on the first day of Chol haMoed (intermediate days of the holiday), going first to Key Largo, the largest of the Florida Keys, and then to the delightful Islamorada, located halfway between Key Biscayne and Key West, there to spend the last two days of Pesach. Unfortunately, on the day we were making our way to Plantation Yacht Marina, part of City of Islamorada magnificent Founders Park, the weather decided to throw some surprises at us in the way of 25 mph winds, with 35 mph gusts and serious chop. I have made a mistake in the video, where it came out as 5 mph gusts, but you can see The Boss bravely manning the helm, corkscrewing the boat through the waves. This is a sailing term, Beautiful People, which means zigzagging, and as tired as he was, he still managed later to corkscrew a bottle of delicious Pinot Grigio I had kept chilled for lunch. He also caught the aforesaid lunch, or at least the main part of it, three nice size rainbow Trouts, which I promptly placed on the grill, with just salt and pepper, sprinkled with lemon juice.

But where is the unleavened bread? Where is matzah? I am glad you asked, Beautiful People, because we are only obligated to eat matzah on the first two days (one day in Israel) of Pesach. For the rest of the holiday, we are simply not allowed to eat leavened bread, or even have it in our possession. That means not only actual bread, but anything made of grain that is leavened or has a potential to be. Even cats and dogs get special grain-free food. We don’t have to eat matzah, but we make all kinds of delectable dishes, using “the bread of affliction,” as it is called in the Hagaddah (The Story of Exodus), read the first two nights of Pesach. I have to note that it is common nowadays to abstain from making those dishes because in the process matzah itself might be leavened. However, I am of the old school, and one of our favorite Pesach treats is Prezhenitza, known in America as Matzah Brei.

As you see in the video, it is simple, easy and quick, and oh! so delicious! And while it is frying, which is only a couple of minutes on each side, please watch this video and marvel at the beauty of my Odessa. Listen to the La Scala trained Muslim Magomaev:

Those born by the sea

Have fallen in love forever

With the tall while masts

And the city by the sea,

The bluest sea in the world,

My Black Sea.

We, my husband and I, feel that this song is about us. Pesach is called the Time of Our Freedom, and nowhere do we feel as free, as on water. Exodus has demonstrated the power of the A-mighty, and we know that it is His Mighty and Generous Hand that sends wind into our sails.

INGREDIENTS

  1. 3 full matzahs
  2. 3 eggs
  3. Boiling water
  4. Salt and pepper to taste

PROCEDURE

  1. Break matzahs into bite-size pieces, cover with boiling water. Keep covered for a couple of minutes, until soft to touch.
  2. Add eggs, salt and pepper, mix well.
  3. Fry in oil for 2 – 3 minutes on each side. Serve hot.

Enjoy!

32 Comments Add yours

  1. HI Dolly, a lovely post. Thanks for sharing about this. I did know about these holidays as I have Jewish friends and we live next door to a Jewish faith school.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting, dear Robbie. From my experience, it’s not only non-Jews, but mostly non-observant Jews who are confused about the holidays.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautifully done, Dolly. That is the way to spend it. The second video tugs at the heart strings.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment, Derrick.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you Dolly for the rich information about Pesach and the recipe

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, dear Philo.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. lghiggins says:

    I didn’t know there were so many different views on the celebration of Pesach. I’m so glad you are able to enjoy your new yacht.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Linda. It’s not a yacht, but a little sailboat, yet the pleasure is immense.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lghiggins says:

        You sent me scurrying to the Internet only to find that yacht terminology is in the mouth of the speaker. There is no steadfast definition. I had always thought of a yacht as a large luxury boat, but when we bought our Catalina 22 (which looks smaller than your sailboat from the pictures), it was referred to as a yacht. I don’t have a pretentious bone in my body, so I always called it a sailboat. Yours looks beautiful. We sold ours this summer. It had been in dry dock for all the years we were in Mexico and the lakes in the West just didn’t have the water needed for sailing. It had become an expense that provided us with no pleasure. Amazingly, we had wind damage to it and a buyer was interested in it as a project boat. The insurance paid us nicely for the damage and everyone is happy. Enjoy your craft!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ah, you had a Catalina! Our old boat was a Catalina 25, and we loved it. This one is an Irwin 32 Citation, and it is roomier, but what is more important, it’s a blue boat, so we are looking forward to some ocean sailing. Thank you so much, dear Linda!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Ren says:

    Amazing! Amazing! Simply amazing! So beautiful… what fun… such love…. Thanx for the sharing, Dolly. I really injoyed this post. Felt as if I were with you. I am so very happy for you and your life creation. Hugz

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dearest Ren!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. It sounds like an easy and delicious dish.

    Thank you for always explaining more about the traditions!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your comment and your interest, dear Mimi.

      Like

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear friend.

      Like

  7. Thanks for another posting full of very interesting information. You had a wonderful trip, whats never a problem with a good sailor. I would get seasick instantly. There are rainbow trouts in the salty sea?? 😉 I think you brought them with you, right? This Matzah Brei sounds a amazing dish, and the read made Matzah looks a little bit like crispbread. Is it the same? Thanks for all the very interesting information, Sally! Enjoy a beautiful weekend! Best wishes, Michael

    Liked by 2 people

    1. No, Michael, my husband caught three rainbow trouts of a decent size. Next to snapper, it’s the most common fish here. Interestingly, I get carsick, if I am not driving, but never seasick. “Those born by the sea…”
      As to crispbread, I’ve seen many different varieties, and especially like the German rye one, but remember, Matzah is just flour and water, and nothing else. I think it makes a difference.
      Have a great weekend, Michael!
      Yours,
      Dolly

      Like

  8. CarolCooks2 says:

    An interesting post loved the second video a lovely way to celebrate Pesach plus a delicious quick and tasty breakfast 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Carol. We have come to the conclusion that, even though, it’s nice to go to services and pray with the congregation, Shabbos and holidays on the boat feel more special to us. In a way, it is a higher spiritual experience.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. CarolCooks2 says:

        I think so too, dear Dolly sometimes that’s just what we need :)x

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Lulu: “Dada says that sounds like a great Passover vacation, except for the sailing part! Apparently sailboats and Dada don’t get along.”
    Charlee: “What about Dada and regular boats?”
    Lulu: “They don’t get along either.”
    Chaplin: “Dada and long piers in rough surf?”
    Lulu: “Nope.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We don’t know anything about sailing because we are not invited aboard (sigh…) and have to stay at home, being taken care of by a kind neighbor.
      Meows and purrs from The Cat Gang.

      Like

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear Henrietta.

      Like

      1. You are welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Brigittas says:

    Доллі, з величезним задоволенням читала , та дивилась..Зрозуміло, що я не знала усіх цих тонкощів, але дякуючи Вам тепер знатиму. Ви дивовижні, але Ви це знаєте))

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Я не знаю про це, але велике спасибі, дорога подруга. 😻

      Like

  11. MR. JAY✅ says:

    ❤️❤️👌👍

    Liked by 1 person

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