Kugel: Where East Met West

With this re-post, I am starting my series of Passover recipes. Enjoy, Beuatiful People!

koolkosherkitchen

At first, Jews had it good in the Roman-administered land which is now France. Having lost their own homeland, they have dispersed throughout immense Roman Empire, settling mostly along trade routes. Even though they were still not allowed to own land, nor practice law or hold any administrative positions (restrictions are nothing new to us!), they were highly valued as physicians, as well as tax collectors and sailors (Jewish Encyclopedia). Acknowledged by the Church in V century, they freely mingled with Christians and even sang Hebrew psalms at the funeral of a Bishop of Aries. Christians, in turn, participated in Jewish Shabbos and holiday feasts (ibid.)

Alas, the Romans exit from the stage of history. Enter Dagobert, King of the Franks, who makes Paris his capital and builds the Saint Denis Basilica. Beloved and admired by most of his subjects for “rendering justice to rich and poor alike” (Durant

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20 Comments Add yours

  1. “Enjoy, Beuatiful People! ” This is not a new word, I hope! Ha ha! Awaiting your pass over recipes, anyway!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. LOL Typos sneak up on me, dear Serena!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Wow! I learn so much from your site, thank you my friend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank YOU for your interest, dear Dorothy!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. ShiraDest says:

    Fascinating, that there are Roman records surviving between the Bar Kochba Rebellion (from which point, I presume, the majority of Jewish settlement in Gaule begins, but weren’t most Roman settlers in Gaul retired soldiers who’d been given land up there, to farm?) and the reign of Constantine. I presume that at that point, the Christians began their (Catholic) prohibitions on practicing Jewish customs, but I believe that various sects of Christians existed until the Inquisition began their dirty work.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Constantine was too concerned with establishing the new religion on his home turf to bother with Gaul, where Jews lived in relative peace and even friendship with the church. Incidentally, before establishing the new religion, he had gone after “the Jewish nation,” i.e. both Jews practicing Judaism and Jews who had switched to Christianity, as he was just a rabid anti-semite, regardless of religion: ““the Jewish nation was driven from its country, and another people was called by God to the blessed election” (Origen of Alexandria).
      Yes, there were various sects during Middle ages, most notable being Gnostics, who were persecuted by The Holy Sea.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ShiraDest says:

        Yup, makes perfect sense.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Any person who does not render justice for G-d’s Chosen People is not rendering justice as far as i am concerned.

    How i do enjoy your history lessons and recipes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mimi! Unfortunately, we cannot reverse or rewrite history, but we can learn it so as not to repeat its mistakes.

      Like

  5. Distressing as much of this original post is, it warranted re-reading

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thank you for re-reading and for your interest, Derrick. We cannot rewrite history or “cancel culture.” However, it bears repeating and remembering.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. purpleslob says:

    You are such a terific teacher, my feline friend! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Coming from a teacher, it’s a great compliment, my favorite purple person! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

      1. purpleslob says:

        It takes one to know one!! 😉 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Awww, thank you, my favorite purple person! 😻

        Like

  7. Trade routes are places for gatherings of goods and to learn and spread complimentary food ideas. 💓

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true.
      Thank you for stopping by and commenting, darling!
      😻

      Like

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