Five Thousand Years of History and One-Minute Cucumbers

This was originally published as a guest post on https://renardsworld.wordpress.com. For some reason unbeknown to us humble bloggers, the Reblog button disappeared from several blogs, Renard’s and mine included. As a wonderful gracious host and a great blogger, Renard has suggested that I “do it the old-fashioned way” by offering the title and link to my post. Here goes:

A “thorny plant that grows beneath the waves, called How-the-Old-Man-Once-Again-Becomes-a-Young-Man” (Epic of Gilgamesh, Tablet IX) bears little resemblance to our common cucumber, yet ancient people who first encountered it in the wild believed in its magical properties. Discovered and cultivated in ancient India about five millennia ago, humble cucumber found its way to Middle Eastern civilizations, as evidenced by its appearance in the Epic of Gilgamesh, King of Uruk, universally considered the oldest surviving work of literature in the world.

Gilgamesh, pretty much a mythical character, was the first super-hero, predating Superman by three thousand years. He didn’t have kryptonite, but was born of a mixed marriage between a man and a goddess and somehow came out as two-thirds god and one-third man – go figure this out! Regardless, he had great power which he abused all over the place, raping any woman who caught his fancy and pressing his subjects into forced labor in order to build magnificent temple towers and impenetrable city walls. Eventually, the cries of his people reached gods who decided that Gilgamesh has grown a bit too large for his britches and needed someone to take him down a notch. So they created a wild guy called Enkidu and sat back to watch a good fight. Lacking television and social media, that was the ancient gods’ only means of entertainment – remember the Trojan war? Same idea.

To continue, please click here: https://renardsworld.wordpress.com/2020/10/14/five-thousand-years-of-history-and-one-minute-cucumbers/

21 Comments Add yours

  1. Laleh Chini says:

    Very interesting dear.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you very much, dear Laleh.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Laleh Chini says:

        My pleasure.❤️

        Liked by 1 person

  2. That looks so good and easy, and thanks for the link to Macka B and his medical advice — that was fun, too.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Isn’t he way cool! Thank you so much, dear Mimi!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. As I missed the original, on which I have now commented, I think you may have missed this one, Dolly: https://derrickjknight.com/2019/02/21/the-epic-of-gilgamesh/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thank you for providing the link which enabled me to enjoy these marvelous illustrations. Obviously, as I was concentrating on cucumbers, I have not delved into the themes and characters not relevant to my post, such Enkidu’s sexual initiation by a prostitute which humanized him, Gilgamesh’s encounter with Utnapishtim, and, of course, the flood. The Epic is such a rich source of both historical and metaphoric material!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Sounds fantastic.Will head over to read more.The first word about from where cucumbers originate. Thank you Dolly, and enjoy the weekend! Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Michael. You too, have a wonderful weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you very much, Dolly! :-))

        Liked by 1 person

      2. My pleasure, dear friend!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Cucumbers make a great side dish. 🥒🌿

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sure do – as well as an appetizer, a salad, or anything else you can think of. So versatile!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Outosego says:

    [ ]

    Five Thousand Years of #History and One-Minute #Cucumbers

    Like

  7. -Eugenia says:

    Interestingly, I including cucumbers on my grocery list today! I love them. I’ll check out your post on Renard’s World.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, dear Eugenia!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. -Eugenia says:

        You’re welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Cucumbers are very Hungarian, as my grandmother would attest. They are eaten in a salad w/ sour cream, a little salt, and vinegar. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Anna! We also had a cucumber salad with sour cream, with dill but no vinegar.

      Liked by 1 person

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