Anything You Can Get Away With, Including Quinoa and Kale

When Oscar Wilde, at the age of 36, published his one and only novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, society was disturbed and the press was outraged. “Unclean”, “poisonous”, and “heavy with the mephitic odours of moral and spiritual putrefaction,” pontificated The Daily Chronicle. In the midst of the strait-laced Victorian age, Wilde calmly responded, “If a work of art is rich and vital and complete, those who have artistic instincts will see its beauty and those to whom ethics appeal more strongly will see its moral lesson” (Holland and Hart-Davis, The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde). This statement clearly defined the emerging philosophy of aestheticism, of which Wilde was an ardent proponent.

 

Heavily laden with decadence, hinting at homosexual liaisons at the time when “love that dare not speak its name” was prosecuted under Criminal Law, the novel delivers Wilde’s message: beauty is the object of life, and art’s purpose is to guide it. As to the book, “The books that the world calls immoral are the books that show the world its own shame,” was his only answer to critics. Aestheticism was gaining popularity to such an extent, that Gilbert and Sullivan, the leading dramatic authors of Victorian era, wrote a comic opera Patience that was a sharp satire on poets, such as Wilde and Swinburne, as well as artists Rosetti and Whistler. The promoters of Oscar Wilde’s lecture tour in the USA made sure that it coincided with the tour of Patience, whose two main characters were poets with opposing philosophies, aesthetic, or idyllic,  versus moral, or fleshly, and both were reputed to have been modeled after Oscar Wilde. The tall, willowy elegant young man in a long coat, with a lily in his hand, his dark long hair flowing, was an instant hit with the ladies. So was the protagonist of Patience, Bunthorne, surrounded by “twenty love-sick maidens,” some of whom were not exactly young, not quite attractive, and not really maidens. The oldest and the least attractive, Lady Jane, expressed her despair in this famous aria:

 

I hope you enjoyed this rendition by the great contralto Anna Collins, Beautiful People, but meanwhile portentous Victorian clouds were gathering over the head of “the most charming aesthetician of all” (Cooper, Oscar Wilde in America). Following brilliant success of his best known play The importance of Being Earnest, he was threatened by the Marquess of Queensberry, creator of the modern rules of boxing and father of Wilde’s intimate friend Lord Douglas: “I do not say that you are it, but you look it, and pose at it, which is just as bad. And if I catch you and my son again in any public restaurant, I will thrash you.” “I don’t know what the Queensberry rules are, – replied the writer, – but the Oscar Wilde rule is to shoot on sight” (Ellmann, Oscar Wilde). Sadly, bravado did not save him from criminal charges of “Gross Indecency,” a Victorian euphemism for homosexuality.

See the source image

Pleading “not guilty,” Wilde responded to the prosecutor’s question, “What is “the love that dare not speak its name“?”

Wilde: “The love that dare not speak its name” in this century is such a great affection of an elder for a younger man as there was between David and Jonathan, such as Plato made the very basis of his philosophy, and such as you find in the sonnets of Michelangelo and Shakespeare. It is that deep spiritual affection that is as pure as it is perfect. It dictates and pervades great works of art, like those of Shakespeare and Michelangelo, and those two letters of mine, such as they are. It is in this century misunderstood, so much misunderstood that it may be described as “the love that dare not speak its name”, and on that account of it I am placed where I am now. It is beautiful, it is fine, it is the noblest form of affection. There is nothing unnatural about it. It is intellectual, and it repeatedly exists between an older and a younger man, when the older man has intellect, and the younger man has all the joy, hope and glamour of life before him. That it should be so, the world does not understand. The world mocks at it, and sometimes puts one in the pillory for it (ibid.)

And “put in pillory” he was, first subjected to public shame and ridicule, albeit not convicted, but eventually sentenced to two years of hard labor at the final trial. Deplorable jail conditions affected his delicate health and a trauma sustained during a fall contributed to his later death. The renowned poet, writer, and lecturer was not allowed paper and pens. Yet he lived up to his own bon mots: “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken” and “To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.” Upon his release in 1987, Oscar Wilde sailed to France, where he lived until his untimely death three years later. The memory of his dedication to art and beauty in life is still with us, as are his famous words: Art is anything one can get away with.

Here is my Oscar Wilde-inspired salad, Beautiful People. My husband said it was delicious, but it’s up to you to judge whether I got away with it.

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups of shredded kale, firmly packed
  • 1 ½ cup quinoa, cooked
  • 1 small sweet potato, boiled, peeled, and diced
  • 1/3 cup grated carrots
  • ½ cup diced fresh celery (1 stalk)
  • ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced and cut
  • ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped

Dressing:

  • ¼ cup apple lemon juice
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Garnish:

  • ½ hard-boiled egg (optional), sliced
  • ½ tomato, sliced
  • Handful of manzanilla olives
  • Coconut chips

PROCEDURE:

  • Toss all ingredients together.
  • Whisk dressing ingredients until blended. Pour dressing over salad, mix thoroughly.
  • Garnish before serving.

Enjoy!

87 Comments Add yours

  1. lifelessons says:

    Fun seeing you compile your salad, Dolly. I’m so glad you added the olives!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Ah, you are also an olive person? Glad you like it, Judy.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lifelessons says:

        Have i ever told you my recipe for cabbage salad? Also a mixture of very odd ingredients that are delicious.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. lifelessons says:

        I don’t like kale, but perhaps I could substitute cabbage? Or perhaps I would like it in your recipe. The coconut chips are the biggest surprise in that recipe.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. You can substitute spinach, I think, rather than cabbage, but maybe you would like kale in this combination. Coconut chips add the crunch and the nutty flavor.

        Like

  2. Garfield Hug says:

    Thanks for recipe👍🥰

    Liked by 4 people

    1. My pleasure, darling, and thank you for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. The inspiration is profound! I should try out your recipe!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, dear Makaitah! I hope you try it and enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. An excellent analysis, Dolly. Anna Collins’s hilarious aria puts me in mind of the “young” dancing ladies in a very good amateur G and S series – many of whom were decidedly elderly. I especially liked your trick with the boiled egg and potato.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, Derrick. I truly value your comments.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. You have the most beautiful dishes! 👁👁🍃

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Gail. You are the first one who caught my “antiquing” hobby. The silver serving spatula is a family heirloom, and the plate was gifted by my son who knew my favorite “antiquing haunts.”

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You and I think alike. My rule is: If I buy it, I have to use it. What an awesome way to keep treasures alive! 👀🍃

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Absolutely! I buy things to enjoy them, not to display them. This house is not a museum.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Rohvannyn says:

    I appreciated learning more about Oscar Wilde – yet another person who I don’t know enough about, though I did read The Picture of Dorian Gray. I should probably reread it, having gained this perspective. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you for your kind comment, dear Rohvannyn, This is one of those books that bears re-reading again and again. The movie is also excellent and very true to the book.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Nice post, and a lovely recipe to boot!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Dorothy; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. SAM VOELKER says:

    When I see a new post by you I usually devour it first. Both to feed mind and body.

    I know from your knowledge and well researched historical lessons to us that you really did not ask for it, but this is my own opinion of Oscar Wilde for what it is worth.

    To me as to his contemporaries, he was an enigmatic individual of the “Golden Age”, especially by bringing to light the “superior” attitude of manhood over the lives of women. Unfortunately Wilde was an over the top self promoter of his self, and to the French and English of his day, “this was not nice”. The things that most got him into trouble overshadowed the things he did for women’s rights. Way ahead of his times in both his own life, and his writings. Today intelligent people (hopefully) look at things differently.

    Mark Twain called the late 19th century the “Gilded Age.” By this, he meant that the period was glittering on the surface but corrupt underneath.

    “Wilde demonstrated unequivocal support for the greater participation of women in public life. He campaigned for them to be granted access to education and the professions, and argued that the ‘cultivation of separate sorts of virtues and separate ideals of duty in men and women has led to the whole social fabric being weaker and unhealthier than it need be’ ”

    Wilde joined the debate by his writing of ‘Literary and Other Notes’ when he declared that, in time, “dress of the two sexes will be assimilated, as similarity of costume always follows similarity of pursuits, feminine attire to any sort of handicraft, or even to any occupation which necessitates a daily walk to business and back again in all kinds of weather”. In his opinion, restrictive clothing prevented women from taking their rightful place alongside men.’

    Well ahead of his times, wouldn’t you say~?
    I have written about this many times~!

    Here is a personal observation on my part; one many of my contemporary women may not admit to it. I asked myself why do so many ladies of my age have such terribly shaped feet~?…..Ha~! I finally came to the conclusion that it was the terrible shoes they had to wear due to what style dictated to them… And this only starts at the bottom and the digression is worse as it worked its way up.

    So to get myself into more trouble:

    Now as to your great recipes: They all sound so fantastic, but due to my living alone, I have been unable to follow some of them, by only having very few of what I consider, “way out ingredients”, Most I do not have in my kitchen of the many required, and some I have never even heard of, with others I may know by another name, like from the Creole way of life…..

    Now what would you do if I sent you a recipe in for the preparation of something which required Cushaw Squash, Mirliton (chayote), or Jerusalem artichoke ~? I know, your husband has already told you about longue de buff, pain perdu, grits, and l’ écrevisses bouillies, but there are many others which you either know by another name of may not have heard of. With cool weather coming up I am already thinking of chorba and couse couse. (we callled it ChoushChoush and made it with cornmeal instead of cracked wheat. {Bulgur ?}) By the way, Gumbo is an African name for Okra, given to the Creoles (and Cajuns) by slaves as was couscous and many other great foods we love~ ! Thus “Creole” means from old world origen, not necessarily from the people involved.

    On second thought, it seems like every time those uplanders learn of such things as they did our Crawfish, or as they call them Crayfish, the price goes up so high that we are reduced to going out to catch them outselves.

    Oh I always need to add one of my terrible poems so here is one in the vein of Oscar Wilde.

    https://mcouvillion.wordpress.com/2020/01/14/music/

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for a wonderful, thoroughly enjoyable – and enjoyed! – comment, Sam. I was aware of Wilde’s defending women’s rights, but I chose a different theme which, in my quirky mind, better coalesced with the recipe. Wilde saw himself as personification of the aesthetic movement and its spokesmen; thus the extravagant appearance and costume. I have to admit, I have always been fascinating by his personae.
      I would be delighted to get your recipes and give you full credit, of course, and yes, I know Jerusalem artichoke and chayote (not Cushaw squash, though). As soon as the Covid thing blows over and my favorite farmer store re-opens, I will be able to buy those vegetables.
      I am amazed that you have been attentive enough to catch the fact that my husband grew up in New Orleans. He did introduce me to Pain Perdu, instead of my standard French toast, but anything involving Crawfish is off limits for us as non-kosher. Due to my husband’s very strict dietary regimen, I had to replace couscous with quinoa.
      Thank you for the link to “the worst opera singer in history,” and I love your charming poem. The line “While on the keys she made that box go” is brilliant; I am still chuckling!
      P.S. We grew up on the Black Sea – are we still “uplanders”?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. SAM VOELKER says:

        Oh I think that you actually have purchased coushaw, but did not know it, as it sometime is used it as a table decoration for it’s colorful in fall colors and looks like a guard. I had seen you use the word quinoa but now know why it is used. The Romans introduced cracked wheat foods all around the Mediterranean. As to my reference to “uplanders”, most people of New Orleans refer to them as “Damn Yankees” but I try my best to not use such bigoted words for any people up landers only means that they came from up from us, I even try to use Donald Trump by his real name.

        I must admit that a lot of the foods that I grew up with were not in any way considered Kosher (may not even know which way to spell it, as different places used different spellings. But I try to learn such things and you are a great help to me.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Dear Sam, I did not take offense at “uplanders” – not at all! Just cracking jokes, as I always do; we are from Odessa, after all.
        I looked up coushaw; her it’s called winter squash. I’ve used it in cooking and baking. There isn’t much to learn about Kosher cooking: no shellfish, no meat and dairy together, certain fish and animals are not considered kosher, and meat has come from animals slaughtered the Kosher way. That’s all, folks. I do appreciate your interest, Sam.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for the literatury and culture lesson, Dolly! The salad looks delicious. I adore the usage of apple-lemon juice in the dressing, and as garnish the coconut chips.Hope i will find these chips here too. Hope you have a nice stay, and you and yours are save. Here the last weeks we got less information abou the virus in the USA, but more about and against DJT. 😉 I would wish within our election periods there would be the same discussion. Michael

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Michael. Have a wonderful weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you very much for the very interesting information, and enjoy your weekend too. Today i had made a short journey to the Czech Republic. Seeing the former border zone i really was shocked. There happend nothing, the last five years. Normally i visit CZ by train, and dont get such impressions.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That’s an interesting insight, Michael. What did you expect to happen there?

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Hello Dolly. Honestly i expected some small parties, at least more community between our Germans and the Czech people living near the border.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I guess I don’t know much about the situation, Michael. Can you explain a little more? Why would you expect German and Czech people start bonding into community?

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Hello Dolly, in my meaning after a so long social distance it should happen. But here in the region sadly to many former expelled from the former German territories of the CSSR. They all want to get back this territory, at least as own state.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I didn’t know people were expelled. How sad! Thank you for an explanation, Michael.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I hope that I was able to explain it reasonably understandably, Dolly.. Unfortunately there is no English-language publication on this particular German problem. If I find one, I’ll send you an email.
        Have a beautiful week. Michael

        Liked by 1 person

      8. But I do read German, Michael; you can just send me a link, when you have a chance. You did explain it very well, thank you. I have not been aware of this situation, and I thank you for bringing it to my attention.
        Have a great week, dear friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Great, Dolly! You can read something from themselves at: http://www.sudeten.de, and more truth – from one of them at: http://www.sudeten-bayern.de, and http://www.witikobund.de. The last one in my meaning very “right wing”, and nobody know how many officials are part of this “Witikobund”. As we are now discussing the “Reichsbürger”, and other similar right extreme”, someone seems to forget all these other groups, with a lot of revanchists inside.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Thank you so much, Michael. I will read them and learn.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. Always a great pleasure, Dolly! I think you dont need to learn too much. Its a part of Germany’s identity, which Germans never lost.

        Liked by 1 person

      12. This is another interesting insight. I learn so much from, you, Michael.

        Liked by 1 person

      13. Me too, Dolly! This past of Germany has captured me since 10 years. I never had believed this before.

        Liked by 1 person

      14. Now I understand how you feel, Michael.

        Like

  10. Great combination of flavors in this salad. I’m definitely for the addition of olives! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much, Ronit! Your opinion means a lot to me. I was hesitating between olives and capers, but I think I’ve made the right choice.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Watching you cook is a joy, and that salad looks like a delight!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mimi; you are too kind!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. CarolCooks2 says:

    An awesome video, Dolly have left a comment there so lovely to see you in your kitchen…A delicious salad 🙂 xx

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Carol. Tell me honestly, please: is the video too long?

      Liked by 2 people

  13. CarolCooks2 says:

    For me as I know you and it is lovely to put a face to the name.. No… However if someone just wants a recipe then yes.. Xxx

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for your feedback, dear Carol; this is extremely helpful!

      Like

      1. CarolCooks2 says:

        You are most welcome, Dolly I hope it helps… ❤️

        Liked by 1 person

  14. marymtf says:

    Love Oscar Wilde. His mother was also an advocate for women’s rights.
    Kale is so good for us, I just don’t know what to do with it. Nice recipe.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Kale is so versatile that you can do anything with it, from soups to salads, to side dishes, to chips – I haven’t figure out how to make a kale dessert yet, though.
      Thank you for a lovely comment, dear Mary!

      Like

  15. Humor, love, magic and murder? Your recipe Dolly is a unique mixture of vegetables and it looks delicious. My summation, is that the unique mixes are Wilde or Wild!🤔👌

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much for a delightful comment darling! You have a Wilde sense of humor.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, Jonathan,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ALWAYS NICE TO “GET AWAY…WITH SOMETHING!”

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I know you are a fellow free spirit, Jonathan.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Too free at times….but being tamed…more-or-less! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      4. “More-or-less” is the operative word here.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Laleh Chini says:

    Very healthy indeed.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Laleh: I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Laleh Chini says:

        My pleasure sweetheart.❤️

        Liked by 2 people

  17. -Eugenia says:

    What a wonderful post, Dolly, and the salad looks delicious. I love olives!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Eugenia; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Lulu: “Our Dada says the world sure did lose out on a lot of good things by treating people like Oscar Wilde this way for so many years.”
    Charlee: “He mentioned someone named Alan Turing, too.”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Our Mama says she agrees with your Dada and, though she knew about Alan Turing trial, she did not know that he had undergone the chemical castration, a procedure used on some prisoners in Soviet Union forced labor camps.
      Mama is upset. We try to comfort her.
      The Cat Gang.

      Like

  19. inspirechief says:

    Thank you for your wonderful post. I got to learn two new things this morning. Your post is insightful and your recipe looks delicious. I didn’t know much about Oscar Wilde until reading your post. Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. lifelessons says:

    Dotty, I put the recipe for the salad I promised you on my blog today. Curious to see what you think of it. For some reason it reinded me of your kale salad a bit.. Same strange mixtures..that end up being delicious.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Judy. I’ll go see.

      Like

  21. K E Garland says:

    Dolly! Look at your beautiful face. I plan to watch the whole video later so I can see if this recipe is doable.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The recipe is very easily doable, dear Dr Kathy, and I thank you for the compliment. If you do watch it, please tell me the truth: is it too long?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. K E Garland says:

        You know I’ll tell the truth lol I’ll let you know.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I truly appreciate that.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. K E Garland says:

        So, I watched the entire video and my answer is yes and no lol Yes, it seems a bit long if I wanted to just watch a video that shows me how to make this dish. No, it’s not too long because I know you’re a storyteller, so it fits your personality, I think. I actually enjoyed hearing about how you and your husband have different diets, so you make separate garnishes and additions for the two of you.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I truly appreciate your taking the time and making an effort to watch the entire video, dear Dr Kathy. Your feedback is very important to me, and I will definitely take it into consideration.
        Sending blessings your way – be well and stay safe!

        Like

  22. Ellen Hawley says:

    Oscar Wilde was the last thing I expected to find here, based on the title, but I’m glad you go away with it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah, dear Ellen, I really do give my free association free reign when I search for a theme. This time it came to me when I was inventing the recipe. Thank you so much for stopping by!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ellen Hawley says:

        I wish I could do it more often. I enjoy your recipes.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I thank you for your kind words.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. Léa says:

    I’ll give it a try but without the egg as I am vegan.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely, dear Lea; my husband also doesn’t eat eggs, and he claims that the salad is delicious without them.
      Than you so much for stopping by and commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  24. chattykerry says:

    I loved your memoir of Oscar Wilde. He suffered greatly for being different and daring to talk about it. When we lived in Cairo, 2003, the police arrested a pleasure boat full of gay men on the Nile then put them in prison. There was an outcry because they were just trying to enjoy their lives as privately as possible.
    Your recipe certainly includes some different ingredients but I love everything apart from the Kale…❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for a wonderful comment, dear Kerry!
      As to kale, you can substitute spinach, if you like it.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s