In Praise of Cabbage and Salt

Once again, the great blogger Renard of https://renardsworld.wordpress.com graciously hosted my funky post. Enjoy, Beautiful People!

Renard's World

Confucius and Cato the Elder had three things in common: both of them bequeathed us lots of wise and inspirational quotes, both of them loved cabbage fermented with salt, and both of them had no idea it was called sauerkraut. To be fair to both distinguished ancient dignitaries, during their lifetimes, and for many centuries afterwards, nobody called this simple, yet exceptionally healthy dish by a German name. Perhaps it is because in 200 B.C.E. the Romans were too busy fighting the Punic Wars and hadn’t gotten around to Germany just yet.


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24 Comments Add yours

  1. Cabbage is highly underrated. Love it!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Your Majesty, for a lovely comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Another quaint culinary curiosity, Dolly.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Cute quaint comment – thank you, Derrick.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. A new cabbage recipe to try, thank you!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You are very welcome, darling! All naturally fermented foods are good for your health, and this is so simple to make.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lghiggins says:

        I have yet to make my own, but I do enjoy a good sauerkraut and I know to look for the ones that are not made with vinegar. Thanks for sharing an interesting story.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Go for it, dear Linda! I make a batch every week, and it disappears faster than I can make it.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m English and love sauerkraut. Too bad it’s expensive here in the UK. Come to think of it, my tortoise likes cabbage too! xo 🐢

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for stopping by, dear friend. Cabbage is expensive? That’s a new one on me! But I am sure that between you and your tortoise you can manage to make sauerkraut.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Perhaps the tortoise will have to show me? I’ve only bought sauerkraut in German shops and in their restaurants when I lived there. In the UK our food is expensive anyway – more than double compared to some Canadian provinces (my fiance is from there). 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Ah, so it’s ready-made sauerkraut that’s expensive. Then you’ll just have to make it yourself – it’s very easy, and the tortoise will help you, I am sure.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Yes! I believe the tortoise can help me, she’s full of secret talents. xo

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Of course; tortoises are wise.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. I don’t know why I thought vinegar had to be added?! I just noticed the recipe I missed before. Thanks to your friend 🙂 I might try it xo

        Liked by 2 people

      6. No vinegar, just cabbage and salt, and maybe some sugar, to help it ferment faster.
        Good luck, dear friend!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Thank you my friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. My pleasure, darling.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. And thanks to YOU for writing the recipe and guest post 🙂 xo

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Always my pleasure, darling!

        Liked by 1 person

      11. 🙂 🥗🥣🥧🧡

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Cabbage is an amazing time traveler. Or maybe it’s the other way around. What a delicious looking share! The history… was a delightful garnishing as well! Big Historical Hugs! ❤️💕☕️☕️💕❤️

    Liked by 2 people

    1. “time traveler” – what a great name for it! Thank you so much for your lovely comment, darling!

      Like

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