Classics Also Quarrel: Russian Pot Pie

Another contribution to the Pie Day, Beautiful People – enjoy!

koolkosherkitchen

The rich also cry, as we all know. It is less known, however, that the classics also quarrel. We tend to perceive them as larger than life, rather not susceptible to flaws and frailties  of us, ordinary humans.  Take, for example, Leo Tolstoy, “the greatest apostle of non-violence that the present age has produced” (Mahatma Gandhi), staunch defender of the peasants’ rights, and a patriarch of a huge family.

Ilya_Repin_-_Leo_Tolstoy_Barefoot_-_Google_Art_Project

Portrait of Leo Tolstoy by Ilya Repin. 

Undoubtedly one of the greatest writers of all times, a philosopher and proponent of social justice, the barefoot Count Tolstoy had a judgmental, unforgiving personality. A brilliant officer, decorated for bravery, he became disillusioned by the tragedy of warfare, resigned his commission, and repaired to Tolstoy family estate Yasnaya Polyana.  The famous “War and Peace” epic appeared a few years later.

The Coming Out, known as “Natasha’s First Ball” from the remarkable 1967…

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20 Comments Add yours

  1. Doug Thomas says:

    My Scottish grandmother made a version of this, and it was a delight! The only thing she made that I liked more were her homemade egg noodles for chicken and noodles, always served on mashed potatoes.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh, we made all our noodles in Russia because store bought ones were not kosher, but noodles on potatoes – carbs on carbs – that’s a new one on me.

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      1. Doug Thomas says:

        Apparently it is an American thing. While it is carbs on carbs, it tastes good, or at least it did at my grandmother’s table. I personally don’t eat the combination these days, preferring chicken and noodles without the competition from the mashed potatoes, which I’d rather eat by themselves, too,

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You are still lucky. My husband’s diet minimizes carbs to almost nothing, so noodles are only plant-based, which are great for Thai or Japanese dishes, and the only mashed potatoes are the sweet ones.

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      3. Doug Thomas says:

        There are limits on my diet because of dialysis. Phosphorus-rich foods are especially “deadly”, as are dairy foods. I can eat them in moderation and if I take a pill that binds to the phosphorus since my kidneys aren’t healthy enough to filter excessive phosphorus out. I get a monthly blood evaluation that shows how I’m doing on several measures. Fortunately, I don’t have diabetes like many other patients in the unit.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. When we reach certain age, we all have to deal with limitations and restrictions. I guess we are paying for overindulging in our youth. I also can’t have dairy, as well as some fruit and vegetables, and my husband is pre-diabetic which we don’t want to turn into full-blown condition.
        Be well and stay safe, my friend.

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      5. Doug Thomas says:

        Your recipes show you are dead serious about doing what’s best for your and your husband’s health. You definitely want to avoid diabetes and the complications that come with that!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I think it’s always better to be dead serious than simply dead. I see challenges as inspiration for creativity.

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      7. Doug Thomas says:

        I am inspired by your creativity! My mother was one of those people who could find ways to make meals when she had to improvise, and her meals were very tasty indeed! I think the Depression and WWII trained many women of that generation to improvise in many aspects of housekeeping.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. I can relate to that, as the hunger and epidemics during and immediately after the revolution and then the devastation of WWII trained women in Russia. My grandmother trained me to make five dinners out of one scrawny chicken and still have enough for chicken soup on Shabbos.

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  2. Mmmm. Looks delish. 👁👁🍃

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for your kind comment, dear Gail!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. purpleslob says:

    Wow, I wasn’t aware he was a Count.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh yes, from an old and very distinguished family.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. The best way to make peace, over a good meal. That does look like a grand one.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment, dear Mimi!

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    1. Thank you so much, dear friend!

      Liked by 1 person

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