Shepherd Pie Light

I hope https://foodimentary.com, who announced that today was a National Pie Day, agrees with my contention that Shepherd Pie is still a pie!

This is a light shepherd pie, so don’t expect to see lamb as a main ingredient. It’s turkey! Not only is it much healthier than lamb or beef, but it is also much cheaper, so you get to cut both dollars and cholesterol – can’t go better than that. The orange potato topping is a combination of your Bubbe’s regular potatoes and sweet potatoes which are generally considered the healthiest food in the world. So you cut on carbs as well, but at the same time, you gain on all kinds of vitamins and minerals (http://www.foodreference.com/html/sweet-pot-nutrition.html).

Contrary to what we all know as the easiest main dish for Shabbos when you expect a crowd – just throw ground beef with some onions and maybe garlic into a baking pan and cover with mashed potatoes! – it isn’t really a shepherd’s pie. First of all – surprise! – if it’s beef and not lamb, it’s called a cottage pie. The real shepherd’s pie is supposed to be made of lamb because in Scotland, shepherds took care of sheep, and cows did not climb mountains. But most importantly, it should also contain some vegetables, mixed with meat.

Shepherd Pie 1.jpgMy standard veggies for this dish are corn and sweet peas, but sometimes I add diced bell pepper (red looks very nice), string beans, even asparagus tips, whatever is in season. You also need to grate a carrot, chop an onion, and squeeze some garlic cloves. But before you do all this, crumble a couple of slices of last week’s leftover challah – I hope you’ve saved it! – and soak in soy, rice, or almond milk. If you don’t use any of those, water will do, but you’ll have to add a tablespoon of vegetable oil. Remember, ground turkey practically has no fat of its own.

While the bread is soaking, you can use the time to grate, chop, squeeze, and check eggs, unless you buy eggs with Hecksher. Mash up the bread the way you would do potatoes, and throw everything else in.  I season it with cilantro, a dash of cinnamon, and a pinch of cumin, in addition to salt and pepper, but feel free to add your favorite flavours.

Meanwhile, your potatoes should be boiling.

Shepherd Pie 2.jpg

You can mash them up by hand, but if you use a mixer or blender, you get a lighter and fluffier “blanket.” This time, I also had a couple of parsnips left from Pesachthat had been cooked in the soup, so I mashed them up as well.

 

Shepherd Pie 3.jpg A little secret to prevent it from sticking to the bottom when it sits in the oven or on the blecht for a while: in addition to oiling the pan, sprinkle some tomato juice on the bottom and sides. Spread the meat and veggies mixture evenly in the baking pan. I prefer to use the one I will already put on the table.

Shepherd Pie 4.jpg

Spread potato mixture in an even layer to cover the meat.

Shepherd Pie 5.jpg

You can make chevron-like designs on top with your spoon and then sprinkle some paprika. This is how it goes into the oven. Then forget about it for an hour, while you are doing something else – always lots of things to do before Shabbos! When your timer rings, remove the lid and bake it for 10 more minutes, to give it a nice crust.

Shepherd Pie 6.jpg

This is how it comes out of the oven, and I garnish  it with some more fresh cilantro on top before serving. Since you have a complex combination of sweet and spicy flavors, with Mediterranean notes of cinnamon and cumin, it is complemented very well by a full-bodied, but dry red wine, like a Cabernet Sauvignon. A heavier or a deeper wine, such as Burgundy, will definitely overwhelm the lightness of the dish.

Meatloaf 7.jpgOn Sunday, my husband is enjoying the ubiquitous Jewish dish that has not changed since Sorah Imeinucooked and Avrohom Avinu welcomed guests, but it is not offered in any Jewish restaurant – ShabbosLeftovers!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 2 slices of bread or Challah
  • 1 cup of frozen corn (you can use canned, but drain it real well)
  • 1 cup of frozen sweet peas (same as with corn)
  • Alternatively, diced bell pepper, string beans, or asparagus tips
  • 1 large grated carrot
  • 1/2 diced onion
  • 2 – 3 cloves of garlic (use more if you like), squezeed
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons of soy, rice, or almond milk
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil, if you use water instead of Pareve milk substitute
  • Diced fresh cilantro
  • A dash of cinnamon
  • A pinch of cumin
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 large potato
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • Paprika to garnish

PROCEDURE

  • Crumble bread and soak in Pareve milk substitute or water
  • Peel and boil potatoes in salted water
  • Mash up soaked bread and add the rest of the ingredients, except potatoes. Mix well.
  • Preheat oven to 350.
  • Oil baking pan and spread meat mixture evenly on the bottom.
  • Mash or whip potatoes and cover the meat mixture.
  • Decorate, garnish, bake for 1 hour.
  • Remove the lid and bake for 10 more minutes.

Note: If left in the oven or on the blecht for several hours, it should be tightly covered.

 Enjoy!

 

73 Comments Add yours

  1. My Shepherd’s pie can be lamb or beef, I love both. The meat and onion has to have an OXO cube or 2 crumbled into it, so that it is moist, and tastes rich. No vegetables in it for this southern English lady, but 8 vegetables on the side. More gravy to top it. My grandmother’s recipe, Mum’s, mine, and now my daughters.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yours is a classic recipe, dear Susie, and it sounds great. 8 vegetables – vow! The more, the healthier, of course. Thank you for your comment!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Being born just after the war in England, if Dad didn’t grow it in the garden, we didn’t eat.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I have never realized it was that bad in England after the war!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. We will had rationing. I have my book.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Yes, I’ve heard about rationing, but again, I’ve never realized it was that bad.

        Like

  2. randyjw says:

    Excellent post, Dolly, and I loved the Shabbos leftovers quip!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Rachel! My husband loves Sunday dinners because they usually include Shabbos leftovers.
      P.S. Saw a great film called “Driver” and a documentary “Sacred Spaces.” Both very impressive, now to work them into a post…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. randyjw says:

        Oh, cool. Thanks for mentioning them. I just had Shepherd’s Pie today! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I hope you enjoyed it, Rachel!

        Like

  3. Lol, at first i thought its a recipe for a cake, because i remembered “pie” in GB-English for cake.
    This one is better, and a full dish. But let me ask, what is a caravan-like design? 😉 Best wishes, Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have no idea, Michael! What is it about?
      Thank you so much for your lovely comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. bingingonabudget says:

    This recipe looks great, I can’t wait to try it. What other recipes from your blog would you recommend?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What do you prefer, darling: chicken, fish, pasta, veggies? Thank you for your comment and your interest!

      Like

  5. Looks delicious. Great idea, to use sweet potatoes for the topping. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Ronit; your comment means a lot to me.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. tidalscribe says:

    That’s an interesting variation on Shepherd’s pie. On Friday my Scottish husband is making his friend ( and me of course ) a Burns’ supper – 25th January is Robert Burns’ birth date,1759. Haggis is sheep’s liver, lungs and heart mixed with oatmeal, suet and spices and I love it. Served with tatties ( mashed potato ) and neeps ( turnips – although we call them sweede in England.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. What a great idea – Burns’ supper! One of these days I have to try haggis – I’ve heard so much about it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Wow, i had no idea that if it was beef it was cottage pie, wait until i tell my Sweetie (and make him your recipe, it looks wonderful).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mimi; I hope he likes it as much as my husband does!

      Like

  8. Fantastic presentation of your recipes, Dolly. Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Kamal!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. GP Cox says:

    Sounds fantastic!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, GP; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Joëlle says:

    Dear Dolly, I totally agree with you on beef and lamb. And I learned a few days ago that eating either is not the best for our planet, in terms of environmental footprints 😔. Buying ground turkey is easy in the U.S., but over here I have to grind it myself — actually I leave the task to my husband, it’s between him and our manual meat grinder!
    Sweet potatoes are so filling, on top of being healthy, so thank you for this recipe!
    P-S: was the movie that you saw « The Driver » (1978), « A Taxi Driver » (2017), or « Baby Driver » (2017)? A French blogger I follow gave the latter a good review, but I see that Rotten Tomatoes rates the second one very highly.
    Have a nice end of week, Dolly!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dear Joelle, the movie is none of those. It was shown for the first time at the Miami Annual Jewish Film Festival, so I doubt that anyone had a chance to see it anywhere, other than in Israel where it was created. It is in English, though, so it is meant for the wider public.
      P.S. My husband got tired of the manual grinder years ago, and we bought a huge electric one, able to process 15 to 20 lbs of fish before every holiday.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. lghiggins says:

    I think what I like most about this recipe is that you can use up so many things that you already have on hand. Nice!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes, just empty out your fridge! Thank you so much, dear Linda!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. CarolCooks2 says:

    Definitely a different take on our traditional shepherd’s pie, Dolly…I made one just last week with the addition of mushrooms as it definitely is a dish where you can clear out the odds and ends from the fridge…I top mine with cheese…And serve with an assortment of vegetables 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. But this actually is a classic recipe, with veggies mixed in. The only difference is sweet potatoes.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. CarolCooks2 says:

        Maybe were you come from dear Dolly my father would have something to say…haha. he was a stickler..Not like you and I giving recipes our own twist.😀 xx

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I see what you mean! So was my father; everything I served him had to be exactly like my grandmother used to do it.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Now this is indeed one of my timeless favs. Now is a most perfect season for this yummy wholesome dish. 😏👍

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, darling; I am so glad you like it!

      Like

    2. CarolCooks2 says:

      I know, Dolly…haha…The only time ( and) I would have smacked my hubby…haha… was when he commented to my mother can’t you cook your vegetables like Carol…I think that was when he realised vegetables were nicer when they were not cooked to death like they were in my grandmothers day 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. LOL My husband did not know my mother, unfortunately, but he and father had a total love affair; each one said that the other one was the kindest person in the world, and neither one of them would ever say anything even remotely critical about the other.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. CarolCooks2 says:

        How lovely, Dolly ..My father would have made agreat food critic in todays world …haha…Bless him 🙂 x

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Is your father still around?

        Like

  14. stella says:

    I definitely will be trying this recipe! I make a ground turkey meatloaf, which I love, and this sounds so good. Frozen corn and peas are staples in my pantry, and I have the rest of the ingredients too, although I will probably use Panko breadcrumbs. Thanks for a good and easy addition to my recipe folder!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Stella! I am so glad you like the recipe. Tip: if you use breadcrumbs, soak them in milk, preferably non-dairy, or at least in water for a few minutes, until soft and mushy. And if you do the same for meatloaf, it will be extra-moist.

      Like

      1. stella says:

        I always soak my breadcrumbs with milk, usually with the egg too. I sometimes use other extenders/binders instead of bread, such as crushed cornflakes or rolled oats (whatever I have.)

        For my meatloaf I use different seasoning for turkey than I use with beef – marjoram, s&p, garlic powder and granulated onion, along with either fresh or dried parsley.

        By the way, your casserole dish looks the same as one of mine!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I do that too (cornflakes or oats, that is). Your turkey meatloaf sounds yummy!
        I have a set of three of those dishes, different sizes, and I love them – from oven to table.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. stella says:

        I have a 2-quart and a 1-quart (no lid). Also have one of those old Vision glass pans that can go on the stove top or in the oven. That one is really large (dutch oven size), and I hardly ever use it.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I think I have one of those too, the clear glass one, but I prefer those that could be microwaved, if need be.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. gresshoppe says:

    Теперь я знаю, как готовить Shepherd Pie. Спасибо, дорогая! но индейку у нас добывать это целая история, поэтому обойдемся бараном)) тем более они у нас гарантированно на вольном выпасе))

    Like

    1. Ну вот, а у нас – с точностью наоборот. Индюшатины навалом, а баранчики, да еще кошерные, на вес золота, и редко бывают.А хотелось бы! Еще хотелось бы нафаршировать телячью грудинку гречневой кашей со шкварками, но это уже вообще из разряда мечтаний.

      Like

      1. gresshoppe says:

        Потому что кошерной телячьей грудинки нет?))
        А мы только что на завтрак гречку ели))

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Есть, конечно, то есть теоретически существует. Практически, поскольку никто не знает что с ней делать, магазинам невыгодно ее предлагать. Кроме того, поскольку все кошерное мясо во Флориду привозят, телятина, как и баранина, которую тоже редко кто покупает, получается дико дорогая. Шкварки я уже больше 20 лет не жарю, а снимаю с птички шкуру и выбрасываю, под возмущенное мурчание котишек. Все мы помешаны на т.н. “здоровой” пище, а мой прадедушка завтракал куском черного хлеба, густо намазанным гусиным жиром со шкварками, и ничего, дожил до 94 (моему сыну на долгие годы до 120ти – носит имя).

        Liked by 1 person

      3. gresshoppe says:

        я в принципе за здоровую пищу, но иногда замкнутый круг получается. Хочется начать утро с зеленого коктейля, но для этого надо запастись травой с вечера да еще и встать пораньше, да еще и на включенный блендер дочка будет жаловаться. А без зеленого коктейля сил нет)))
        Вот так и живем))
        А как прадедушку звали?

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Авраам Хаим, Житомирский раввин. Сына зовут Авраам Иммануил, но в наше время такие имена в метрику не вписывали, поэтому записан Аркадием, зовем Алик, Американцы зовут Алекс. Мы верим что новорожденным надо давать имена усопших родственников, и вместе с именем передается характер.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. gresshoppe says:

        Какие красивые библейские имена! Величественные, торжественные…
        Светлая память умершим и бесконечного здоровья живым! 💕

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Аминь! Спасибо сердечное, дорогая.
        Я навестила прадедушкину могилу в 1995, когда ездила в Одессу на 200-летие. Могила окружена свежими цветами и усыпана записками (это такая традиция, просить благословения у усопших праведников в письменном виде). Душа радуется – не забывают!

        Liked by 1 person

      7. gresshoppe says:

        Наверное, трогательное зрелище
        И как хорошо, что семья, через такие ритуалы, по прежнему вместе. Какая хорошая традиция про благословение и записки! Никогда не слышала про нее. Даже подумала, что стоит такой традиции научиться.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Если ты когда-нибудь видела фото Стены Плача в Иерусалиме, там такие записки воткнуты в щели. Президент Трамп тоже навестил Стену и записочку засунул. Все могилы праведников утопают в таких записках.

        Like

      9. gresshoppe says:

        Да, я слышала про Стену Плача. Только там еще не была пока. Думала, что это только Стены Плача касается. А оказывается, это семейная традиция тоже, просить не каких то посторонних людей, а самых близких. Мне кажется, это очень красиво и правильно.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Традиция не столько семейная, сколько религиозная, а праведники – никому не посторонние. Мы когда-то перед экзаменами ездили в Умань, на могилу Раввина Нахмана из Бреслава и оставляли записки. Но своих родных просить о заступничестве, разумеется, считается более эффективным.

        Like

      11. gresshoppe says:

        Здорово, что эта традиция не забыта

        Liked by 1 person

      12. Разумеется, ведь это то, во что мы глубоко верим.

        Like

  16. Markus J. says:

    cool

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    FOR SHABBOS-SHABBAT OR ANY OTHER MEAL…COTTAGE PIE IS A DEAL!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear friend!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Reblogged this on koolkosherkitchen and commented:

    Once again, it’s a National Pie Day, and Shepherd Pie is still a pie, isn’t it? Enjoy, Beautiful People!

    Like

  19. I always have to think about the distinction between sheered and cottage when I post that we’ve had one of these. Maybe your turkey should be gobbler 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for a great name, Derrick! Gobbler indeed!
      According to most sources, shepherd and cottage pies are one and the same. The only slight distinction is that cottage pie requires red meat, while shepherd pie could easily be a “gobbler.”

      Liked by 1 person

  20. A hearty dish. Cilantro I would willingly eat off the lawn (LOL).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Anna! In Georgia (country, not state) they serve bunches of fresh cilantro on a separate platter to accompany meat dishes. Are you sure you don’t have Georgian ancestry?

      Liked by 1 person

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