Patriotic Fruity Pizza

Happy Independence Day, Beautiful People! I’ll take independence any day; to quote Janis Joplin,

Image result for janis joplin freedom quote
Here is a fun patriotic dessert for you, offered by https://www.womansday.com/food-recipes.

INGREDIENTS
 
Flour, for the parchment
(16-oz.) package refrigerated sugar cookie dough
2 tbsp. Strawberry jam
2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1 lb. strawberries, hulled and cut into pieces
1 1/2 c. blueberries
(8-oz.) package cream cheese, at room temperature
1/4 c. confectioners’ sugar
2 c. refrigerated whipped topping (we used Cool Whip)
DIRECTIONS
 
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly flour a piece of parchment paper. Shape the cookie dough into a disk, then roll out on the parchment into a 12″ circle or three 1⁄4″-thick circles. Slide the parchment (with cookie dough) onto a baking sheet. Bake until lightly golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Transfer the cookie (still on parchment) to a wire rack and let cool for at least 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the jam and lemon juice. Add the berries and toss to coat. Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese and sugar in a large bowl until smooth, about 1 minute. Add the whipped topping and beat to combine.
  3. Spread the cream cheese mixture onto the cooled cookie, leaving a 1⁄2″ border. Top with the berry mixture.

Here is my contribution to the patriotic celebration: https://koolkosherkitchen.wordpress.com/2016/07/04/fireworks-on-the-beach/

51 Comments Add yours

  1. leggypeggy says:

    Happy Independence Day to you too.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, dear Peggy!

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Blackhorn33 says:

    As always, this sounds GREAT! Shame it’s 2:30am, or we would be having a Patriotic Fruity Pizza.
    I hope you and your Family has a great Independence Day!
    Now, Janis Joplin???? Needless to say, you blew me away with that one.
    She was from Port Arthur, TX I believe, and very talented.
    Bad part was that she attended school at U of TX in Austin, with all the little upper crust, who voted her ugliest man on campus…. Now can you believe where all this Bullying came from.
    I send all Good Things your way
    Sincerely,
    Robert

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ha, if I ‘blew you away” with Janice Joplin, wait till I quote Jim Morrison (“Listen to the Texas radio on the big beat”)!
      I am glad my little funky post elicited interesting memories, Robert.
      Have a great Independence Day, and, to quote a great Russian poet Pushkin, “There is no happiness in the world, but serenity and freedom.”

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Happy National Independence Day!!!!!

    Like

  4. ren says:

    Perfect timing! My 3 year old friend recently told her mom, “Ren says, Blueberry Pizza”. Of course her mom asked me what it was…..
    It was just something I ‘made up’ during our ‘playtime’. I had mentioned that Blueberry Pizza would be good!
    I may alter your recipe here a tad and make us Blueberry Pizza for Tea Party Time.
    What fun!!
    Thanx Dolly!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so glad, dear Ren! have loads of fun with your little friend and enjoy your Blueberry pizza!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Joëlle says:

    Happy 4th, Dolly!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Joelle!

      Like

  6. purpleslob says:

    Patriotic Pizza sounds wonderful!
    How was your Independence Day, Dolly??
    Too many fireworks booms this week!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was fun – I love fireworks! How was yours, Melinda?

      Like

  7. robbiecheadle says:

    This sounds fun and delicious, Dolly.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Robbie!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. timkeen40 says:

    Happy 4th a day late…

    Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose…

    Might be the greatest line in a song, poem, or story ever….

    Tim

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree! Thank you for your kind comment and for the follow.

      Like

  9. PS says:

    This sounds delicious!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. PS says:

        🙂 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  10. hello koolkosherkitchen its dennis the vizsla dog hay hmm yoozhually my dada has pepperoni and mushrums on his pizza but he seems to think this wun wood mayk a gud dessert!!! i wunder if he wood giv me sum!!! ok bye

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We hope he shares with you, dear Dennis!
      Meows and purrs from The Cat Gang

      Like

  11. Reblogged this on koolkosherkitchen and commented:

    Happy July 4th, Beautiful People!

    Like

  12. weggieboy says:

    A great way to get your vitamin C and other nutrientgs of frresh fruits! LOL! Never mind! This is a delicious way to celebrate the holiday or any other time blueberries are in season. Hope you had a great holiday, Dolly!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ll celebrate blueberries any time! Fortunately, we have “seasons” four times a year.
      Yesterday we were still recovering from the Vegas trip, the time change, and the horrendous night flight. I defrosted some soup and managed to scramble together chicken fried rice with a celery salad. As an afterthought, I quickly baked Victorian sandwich cake, to have something resembling a celebration. Watched a nice Russian movie after the fireworks and conked out.

      Like

      1. weggieboy says:

        Wow! What a busy time for the end of a vacation trip! Sounds like some good eating at your home, though. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised!

        Russian films can be very interestiung, though it’s been some time since I’ve watched one. Any recommendations? I’ve seen the classic Eisenstein movies, of course – Battleshi[p Potemkin, Alexander Nevsky, and Ivan the Terrible;; and these – Stalingrad, Kolya. I know I’ve seen other Soviet-era films, but the names are lost to me…it’s been a few years.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That was not a vacation, Doug. I hate Vegas with a passion and would never go there on vacation. It was my husband’s business convention, and I was there in supporting capacity (design and decoration of his booth, as well as photo and video-taking). Hard work and a grueling night flight back that was late on both legs of the journey.
        It seems that you’ve seen all the classics, so I’ll have to do a search for the good modern ones that have been dubbed into English, or at least subtitled. The first one that comes to mind is Aesop with Aleksandr Kalyagin, but I might be biased, as he is a friend. Have you seen the Oscar-winning Burnt by the Son? It came out in 1994. There are also mini-series Master and Margarita https://youtu.be/1t6W9hkXV6g, cery accurately based on the eponymous novel by Bulgakov, considered by many THE novel of the century.

        Like

      3. weggieboy says:

        Yes, “Burnt by the Sun” is one I’ve seen at least twice, perhaps three times. I had it on VHS tape. Thanks for mentioning it! It was such a good film I remember loaning it out.

        “The Death of Sta.lin” was another really good film (about Russia, if not a Russian film) for how it showed the loyalist around him had to deal with his final moments – and, by their fear of acting, contributed to his death!

        Fascinating!

        I prefer subtitles over dubbing since the mouths never really match the words spoken, something I find much more distracting than reading the subtitles.

        I’ll check Master and Margarita out. I enjoy mini-series, especially period pieces like those the BBC is master of.. Perhaps this will be like that! The description looks like it will be something I can enjoy! (Quite a story line!)

        Liked by 1 person

      4. We saw “The Death of Stalin” and liked it a lot. I am glad you saw “Burnt by the Sun;” it’s one of the most profound films telling the truth of the Stalin era.
        Master and Margarita had been forbidden for many years, and those who were lucky enough to have it, would sometimes charge prospective readers by the hour to come to their homes and read it. In order to be trusted with something as dangerous as this book, one had to know the password which usually was one of the quotes from it, and it changed from time to time.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. weggieboy says:

        Excellent literature came out of the Soviet Union in the form of those under ground novels!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Not only literature, but music, art, films, theater. I had a collection of art that was considered subversive. I had to give it out before I left, of course, to very trusted friends.

        Like

      7. weggieboy says:

        Yes, and I believe we in the West probably saw, heard, read more of these treasures than Soviet citizens, thanks to people sneaking them across the border. When did you come to America?

        Liked by 1 person

      8. I was a refusenik (refused to be issued an exit visa) for 7 years, and then expelled from the USSR in 1978. You are right; most Soviet citizens had never heard of literature considered subversive, but in the same way as manuscripts were smuggled to the West, published books trickled back, sometimes printed on onion paper, taken apart, sewn into lining of clothes or suitcases, and assembled in secret hiding places inside the country.
        When Solzhenitsyn won the Nobel Prize, a campaign was mounted in the papers to condemn and besmirch him. Those campaigns usually included letters to various papers from “the people,” i.e. factory workers, villagers, etc. Most of those letters started with “I have never read Solzhenitsyn, but I condemn him as a traitor and an enemy of Soviet people.” Obviously, none of those people had an opportunity to read subversive literature. In addition to that, admitting to having read it would quickly earn 8 – 15 years of The Gulag Archipelago. One of my friends fell victim to his own lack of caution and a neighbors’ curiosity; “The Cancer Ward” was spotted on his desk through a keyhole.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. weggieboy says:

        America is better for your travail! I think Americans need to hear from people who have survived totalitarian regimes and the injustices they impose on their citizens. I don’t like the way things are going now with Trump, and fear we could slip into a Soviet-style leadership by personality worship.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. My father, may he rest in peace, loved to celebrate Thanksgiving and always raised the first glass with “God bless America for taking us in!” I feel the same way. As to leadership, I think Boccaccio said it best in Decameron (he was talking about Rome): if the pope has mistresses and illegitimate children and the cardinals collect immense wealth at the expense of the populace, but it still stands, it is undoubtedly the strongest country in the world.

        Liked by 1 person

      11. weggieboy says:

        Goodness! (Well, “goodness” has nothing to do with it!)

        Like

      12. I believe that in every situation, it is His Goodness that saves the day, rather than any individual leader.

        Like

      13. weggieboy says:

        Me, too! I have a metal sign on my wall where I see it every time I go into the kitchen: Count Your Blessings. It helps focus on the source of those blessings as well!

        Liked by 1 person

      14. Good idea! We wake up with a blessing, and then, during the day, say about 100 blessings, including the three daily services. We basically say a blessings on everything we eat, drink, and do. My grandmother, may she rest in peace, even said blessings on everything she cooked or bakes. When I was little, I thought she was talking to her pots and pans, and that’s why her food was so delicious!

        Liked by 1 person

  13. weggieboy says:

    p.s. The kitty in this video version of “Master and Margarita” (which was quite entertaining and funny – thanks for recommending it!) reminded me a lot of my two kitties, especially when it pulled a gun and started firing on the soldiers. Quite like my two! LOL! Don’t mess with pussycats! That cat was really well done, I thought, as were the other special effects (ripping the head off the magician to appease the audience, then reattaching it – gad!).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so glad you like it! Did you have a chance to see it to the end, i.e. who that kitty actually was?

      Like

      1. weggieboy says:

        I missed the names until I read the summary – the cat’s name was Behemoth. Anyway, I figured he was Woland’s sidekick and hitman. I don’t know who or what ’30s Moscow person or element he was supposed to represent in this satire, though he liked his chess, his, and vodka, was sarcastically funny, out of control. I guess that could be pretty much any apparatchik on the lower l;evels.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh, I didn’t mean that, sorry to have mislead you. None of the characters are clearly recognized as specific persons, other that the Master, who is the author himself to a very large degree, and Ivan the poet, a clear satire on Dem’yan Bedny, one of the “futuristic proletarian” poets of that period. I meant that both Behemot and Fagot had been punished centuries ago for offending Woland in some way and had to serve their time as those characters. Behemot is a young page, and Fagot is a knight.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. A refreshing Summer treat. Thanks, Dolly! 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you, dear Anna; I am glad you like it.

      Like

  15. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    CELEBRATE! YOU TOO, JANIUS! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear Friend!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Christy!

      Liked by 1 person

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