Going Nuts Over Coffee Chocolate Cake and a Nomination

The Book of Prophet Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) mentions a Babylonian chief officer, one Nebo-Sarsekim who served as king Nebuchadnezzar’s right hand during the siege of Jerusalem (Ch.39).  In 2007,  historian M. Jursa found proof of this, including the officer’s name, on a small clay tablet, while working at the British Museum (http://www.britishmuseum.org).  To make a long and tragic story short, Nebuhadnezzar won and, in addition to the usual spoils of war, took with him to Babylon the entire Jewish intellectual elite. Here is the Hebrew Slaves Chorus from Verdi’s famous opera Nabucco:

In reality, though, they weren’t treated very badly. Certainly, “by the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept” and lamented the very fact of exile, but altogether Nebuhadnezzar had not wanted cheap labor; he neatly executed a total brain drain.  It was difficult, though, to get used to a strange language, outlandish customs, and weird food. Babylonians loved nuts of all kinds and were especially fond of walnuts. The arrogant king at some point went nuts himself, went down on all four, and for seven years ate grass together with farm animals.

nebuchadnezzarbywilliamblake1795

Don’t worry about him, though; having learned his lesson, the king was restored to the throne and went right on gobbling nuts. We are going to be more careful with walnuts, but I am not a little overwhelmed and in danger of going nuts myself because:

  1. First, the paperback version of my book will be released and available by the end of the week (I will announce the exact date when I know it), but meanwhile, the e-book is here https://www.amazon.com/author/koolkosherkitchen, and I can’t think of a better holiday present at this price! PLease help me spread the word!
  2. Secondly, this is the second year in a row that this humble blog has been nominated for a prestigious Best Food Blog 2017 award. I don’t know how to thank you enough for your support, Beautiful People, other than to share with you a delicious recipe full of nuts. But first, since it is a competitive award, please click on the link below and vote!

https://wp.me/p1QTwN-4he

I thank you in advance! There are many great bloggers nominated in different categories; please vote for them as well! And of course, I am grateful to an awesome blogger Nepaliaustralian who is running this show!

cfwlnchoccake 1.jpg

This will be a moist, nutty, coffee-and-chocolate two layer cake with creamy cashew frosting. For the cake itself, you need whole wheat or gluten free flour, eggs or substitute,  Smart Balance, brown sugar, roughly chopped walnuts – that king Nebuchadnezzar was not a very refined individual; in fact, he was quite rough! – liquid espresso, and unsweetened cocoa powder.

cfwlnchoccake 4.jpg

You can bake it as one cake and then slice it, but I found it easier to bake two even layers to begin with. Meanwhile, we can add more nuts by making frosting.

cfwlnchoccake 2.jpg

To make creamy frosting, you have to soak raw cashews in water for at least an hour. Drain them and blitz them in a food processor or blender with some almond milk, agave, lemon juice, a touch of vanilla, and, of course, more espresso.

cfwlnchoccake 5

Are you counting? We have three different kind of nuts already – really going nuts! This is totally yummy on its own, as a pudding, but spread on this Coffee Chocolate Cake – heavenly!

cfwlnchoccake 6.jpg

Decorated with more walnuts and coffee beans, it will grace your table and make you look like royalty – just make sure not to go nuts!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup Smart Balance or any butter substitute, room temperature
  • 2 eggs or substitute
  • 1/3 cup roughly chopped walnuts
  • 1 tablespoon liquid espresso
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

For icing:

  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 1/2 cup almond milk
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon liquid espresso
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon agave
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

PROCEDURE

  • Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly mist 2 baking pans with oil.
  • Mix dry ingredients, including walnuts, put aside. Whisk wet ingredients together, add dry ingredients, mix thoroughly.
  • Bake for 25 – 30 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in the middle comes out dry. Remove from oven, completely cool in pans.
  • Pre-soak cashews in water for 1 hour. Drain, place in food processor, add the rest of ingredients, pulse until creamy consistency, occasionally scraping sides.
  • Spread frosting between layers and on top, dust with cocoa powder, garnish with walnut halves and coffee beans.

Enjoy!

60 Comments Add yours

  1. A_Boleyn says:

    I rarely make cakes and frosting … even rarer but I enjoy other people’s cake baking posts. Sound delicious.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much; I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Wow hearty congratulations, Dolly and must say awesome presentation of a lovely cake sounds yummy and delicious.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, dear Kamal! I am so glad you like the cake!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Great post Dolly and you get my vote too 🙂 All good luck.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Irene! The voting system is a little confusing, I think, but you have to enter the category and the number of nominee in the comments. Thank you in advance for your support! 😻

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I just did so, Dolly. You can see this in the answers to the post at their blog. And yes, it is a little confusing.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. You are so sweet, dear Irene! Thank you again!

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Garfield Hug says:

    Congrats! Twice in a row too! Love your recipe. Thanks😁

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. spearfruit says:

    Congratulations on your nomination Dolly. You have my vote. Well deserved ! Gary

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, Gary!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Sumith says:

    Congratulations again Dolly. And thanks for sharing this lovely cake recipe.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Sumith!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Osyth says:

    Blake, Verdi and coffee cake what more can I ask for on a slightly drear Wednesday afternoon? My birthday cake was always coffee … mother has long stopped making it but how I loved it then. Walnuts are almost worshipped in Grenoble which elected itself the capitol of les noix centuries ago (though I think some regions in the West might argue the toss 😉). I love ‘The Slave’s Chorus’ with a passion and also love Nana Mouskouri’s version, sung in French ‘Comme tu chantes, je chantes avec toi liberté’ … I posted it on FaceBook after the Bataklan atrocity. Freedom and the right to enjoy it knows no language barriers. Blake is incomparable and your story telling brings everything so brilliantly to life. I am thrilled the paperback is on it’s way. I am currently in Paris but when back will give lots more shout outs on Twitter and FaceBook for you. And of course I will vote for you. How can I not?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, and thank you again! I had no idea that Grenoble was a “nuts” land. I thought that distinction firmly resided with California; however, South Florida vies for a title of “Fruits and Nuts.”
      I have never heard Nana Mouskouri singing any operatic numbers, so that’s something to look up and enjoy – thank you for telling me. Totally unrelated to the Bataclan theater tragedy, Cubans in South Florida had a tradition for many years: any time Nabucco was performed here, they would stand up in the audience and sing “Mia patria si bella e perduta” together with the choir, and then have the conductor and the choir repeat the Chorus.
      But freedom, as you know, is what we have “when they have taken away everything else,” so only those who have lost everything know what true freedom is. Enjoy Paris – have a great time!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Osyth says:

        Walnuts (noix), hazelnuts (noisettes) and chestnuts (châtaigne or marrons) are all grown in several different areas of France. Whether we actually export them is debatable. The French tend to be more concerned with feeding their own than others which is actually something I think many could learn from. This song is so exquisitely moving and uplifting I th ink it no surprise that many peoples have taken it to heart and sung it 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I was aware of chestnuts, of course, although never liked them. Expatriate Cubans especially related to this song as they have always believed that one day they would return.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Osyth says:

        Noooooooo ….. I think it may be some sort of mortal sin in this nation of lapsed Catholics to not like a chestnut 😉

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Mea culpa, but I still not like them, and I am allowed to, since I am Jewish! So there! 😻However, I came across a recipe that involves chestnut paste, and I might give it a try.

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Osyth says:

        Chestnut paste is delicious … a standby of French cooking! Do try – sweet nutty deliciousness. Also Chestnut flour which is the local flour in my Cantal place is wonderful and gluten free. i make it into pancakes and cakes – it is delicious …. so you never have to bite into the soft not nutty-nut at all 😉

        Liked by 2 people

  8. dtills says:

    So exciting!! Congratulations, I can’t wait until the Award post 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, dear, but I have to win it first, and for that I need votes! It’s very competitive.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Greedyeats -Neha says:

    that looks yummy and I love the fact that it’s healthy.!! Thanks for the recipe. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, dear Neha; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for the wonderful clip from Nabucco. And congratulations on your nomination. All good wishes.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment! Happy Holidays to you and yours!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. The recipe sounds delicious. And I didn’t know the stories about king Nebuchadnezzar. Thank you for telling them!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for stopping by and for a lovely comment. I am glad you like the post!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. What a reaping… Great share my friend!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. reocochran says:

    Congratulations, Dolly! I appreciate your stopping by to check our my posts. I’m sure my comment with all my votes is going to appear when she checks her pending approval area. . . You were given my vote, for sure! 🎈❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. As you were given mine, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Yum!!! Congratulations on your nomination!!! I’m hoping that you and yours have recovered from the negative things that resulted from the hurricane!

    I so love your consistent and continued support of my words and me! I always love to see your likes in my alerts!! You are so kind to spend time with my words! I am happy that you find them worthy!!
    Chuck
    xo

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, Chuck! We have not found the boat, unfortunately, but the important thing is, through you, we found wonderful David, and the website is almost ready to be launched!
      I love your haikus and always enjoy reading them. I also like your choice of other poets’ work you share on your blog. Sending blessings your way,
      Dolly

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Oh, I’m so happy to hear that David has been able to help you! He has a big heart and helpful spirit! You make me happy to know you have been able to get back on track. So sorry to hear they haven’t located your boat – Weird!

        I’m glad you are enjoying my haikus! They are fun to write – you might try one?? It’s an easy recipe to follow – 3 lines #1 five syllables; #2 7 syllables; #3 5 syllables and presto you have a haiku. So, My Dear I am going to challenge you here to write a Haiku about one of your most delicious desserts. Or maybe try one on “Angel Food” – Ha!

        Thank you so much for your sweet blessings!

        Blessings to you, My Dear,
        Chuck
        xo

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Dear Chuck, this is one challenge I am not going to answer, and here is the reason. I had been writing poetry since elementary school, to the point that I had to train myself to write prose when college papers came about. As I lived and tried to function – and fight! – the communist regime, all my poems and later on short stories were subversive, either in content or in style. On the day before the night of the KGB search of my apartment, I had a premonition that something was going to happen, and I burned everything that might have been incriminating, including my own poetry and fiction. It took me years of living in a free country to start writing again, but I cannot bring myself to write anything but non-fiction and academic papers. It’s not like me to admit that I cannot do something, but this – I can’t!
        I am sorry, dear, but how about I dedicate the next dessert to you and YOU write a haiku about it? Deal?

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Reblogged this on koolkosherkitchen and commented:

    It’s an International Chocolate Day today, not to be confused with the World Chocolate Day, which is in July. You didn’t think I would miss this one, Beautiful People, did you? In the middle of holidays I simply don’t have time to come up with a new post, so here is an old one. Enjoy!

    Like

  16. purpleslob says:

    What’s the difference between World Chocolate Day, and International?? A bit confusing there, but any excuse for more chocolate!! lol
    But Israel had almonds, right? You just didn’t have cashews, and walnuts?
    Yep, Nebuchadnezzer defied God, and learned his lesson!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I had the same question and tried to find the answer. No luck! But the more chocolate, the better, so as far as I am concerned, let’s have a chocolate day every day, my favorite purple person.
      You are correct; Israel had almonds. I love this opera, and in a good production, when he starts crawling on all four, it’s a very powerful lesson.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. purpleslob says:

        I’ll vote for that! If I don’t chocolate, I haven’t eaten all day! lol Yes, it is!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. purpleslob says:

    Oh yeah, did you win the award??<3

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I did, two years in a row. Then I stopped accepting all kinds of nominations and stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. purpleslob says:

        Yay!! Congrats. I know, it got to the place where I was over it! ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you, dear purple person!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. purpleslob says:

        Always my pleasure!! ❤

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Dark chocolate and nuts for me. I like the video and the Blake extract.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Derrick. In South Florida, whenever Nabucco is produced, the audience demands encores of La Pensiere, accompanied by a standing ovation. It takes a few minutes for people to calm down and the opera to continue.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging, dear Edward.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. chattykerry says:

    Many congratulations on both the book and the nomination, Dolly. You certainly deserve success with both. I love your stories that accompany the delicious recipes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Kerry, you are very sweet!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I love walnuts. My grandmother used to bake them into strudel. I never knew that Nebuchadnezzar had similar tastes (LOL). Wishing you much success w/ the paperback version of your book, Dolly! ❤ ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Anna. I also put walnuts in my strudel (and almost everything else, as well).

      Liked by 1 person

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