Ukrainian Borsht for Sultana

Today”s word prompt is LEGEND. Here is a legendary siege soup, a favorite of a legendary woman, and a traditional part of a Chanukkah menu in my family. Happy Chanukkah – enjoy, Beautiful People! https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/legend/
Remember, Kool Kosher Kitchen e-book is coming out on Saturday, available for pre-order on Amazon.com right now!

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Nobody seems to know where the word borscht came from. The best guess is that it is a combination of schti (Russian cabbage soup) and buryak (beetroot in Ukrainian).  It is first mentioned in the legend about the two-month siege of the Ukrainian fortress Rohatyn by the Crimean offshoot of the Turkish army in the beginning of the sixteenth century. Trying to feed several hundreds of hungry people, including women and children, the Cossacks, defenders of the fortress, collected every edible vegetable (root vegetables, as it was winter) and put them into meat broth. When they ran out of meat, they went vegan and kept cooking only vegetables: carrots, potatoes, beets, cabbage, and beans. It was warm and filling, and it sustained the population for two months. Unfortunately, the defense was broken, Rohatyn was taken, and many captives were transported to a slave market in Constantinople.

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Among those captives was…

View original post 1,101 more words

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20 Comments Add yours

  1. Wow awesome never knew so much history behind this soup, Dolly. Looks quite yummy too.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Kamal! I truly admire this lady – she was very special.

      Like

      1. Great Dolly always welcome

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Have a great weekend, darling!

        Like

      3. Thanks Dolly same to you too

        Liked by 1 person

  2. spearfruit says:

    My grandmother from Poland used to make something like this for me when I was very small. I have fond memories of it, Luv Gary

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am glad my recipe brought good childhood memories for you, Gary.

      Like

  3. [ Smiles ] This is the first time I encountered a soup recipe that actually required a sweetener.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. According to historical records, Hurrem was a very sweet lady, but with a vicious bite! Thus, sweetener combined with garlic.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Great history behind Borscht! I love it, however I have never knew much about it! 😍😉

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am a history freak – I believe there is history in everything, so I go and research until I find something fascinating. I am glad you like it! Thank you, dear Vero! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

      1. And it’s absolutely amazing! I always look for something interesting as well. It gives the food ‘different view’ 😍 Keep posting like that, please! I am enjoying it a lot ❤️💞

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you so much for your kind words, dear Vero! 😻

        Liked by 1 person

  5. geno says:

    I love borsht ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great – enjoy! Thank you for stopping by!

      Like

      1. geno says:

        it was delicious and tasted very good:

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am glad! Nice to meet you, Geno!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. oldpoet56 says:

    Great piece of history, thank you for taking of your time to ‘educate’ folks like me, I appreciate you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, I am a history freak – you know it by now, Ted! The incredible part is that this one is true history, rather than a legend. That was quite a girl!

      Like

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