“All You Need Is Love” – Zoodles, Part 2. Soudles.

Fibonacci was never married. We don’t know for sure, and maybe he was, but I choose to believe the story of a perfect spiral.

fibonacci

“Bellissima Donna, ” he pleaded,  – ” I love you and ask for your hand in marriage!”

“But what is it you are holding, Signore? What did you bring me? It looks like a head of cheese!! Do you think we don’t have cheese in the house?!”

“Carissima, I brought you the most precious thing in nature, a perfect spiral!”

“Signor Leonardo, I should think that a suitor would usually bring fiori – flowers!”

“Cara mia, it is a flower – cavolfiore, a cauliflower which is a perfect spiral.”

“Signor Leonardo Fibonacci, you might be a math genius, but all I need is love and some real flowers that show it, and I don’t want your perfect vegetables and your silly spirals!”

“Oh bellissima, but what can I do when every flower is a spiral…”

Poor rejected Leonardo Fibonacci! He was a math genius, and he was, of course, correct: every flower is a spiral, but it did not win him the heart of a beautiful signorina. However, every spiral, from a rose, the symbol of passion, to a humble cauliflower, to the famous Tower of Pisa, built in front of his eyes as he was growing up, starts at the center. When you spiralize vegetables, you start at the center as well, and when you finish, you are left with a slender cylinder capped with a backside of your vegetable.

Zoodles soup 1.jpg

You can enjoy them crudo (raw) with a dip of your choice, but I resisted the temptation and, to continue my Zoodles series (for Part 1, click here), made a creamy soup – Soudles. I have collected centers of several small zucchini (you can use 1 medium zucchini instead). Armed with that, I started by slicing half of a small onion and a few cloves of garlic.

Zoodles soup 2.jpg

You need to saute all three together in about a tablespoon of olive oil for about ten minutes, stirring frequently, until onion becomes translucent, and zucchini softens. I would start with onion and garlic slices, let them get better acquainted, and add zucchini after a few minutes. Make sure your garlic doesn’t brown as you want to achieve the beautiful green color at the end. Transfer all this into a soup pot, cover with cold water, and leave it to cool off.

Zoodles soup 3.jpg

Once it cools off, pulse it in a food processor or blender, together with about 1/3 inch (1 cm) of grated ginger, the same amount of grated white turmeric, and some fresh parsley stems, until creamy and fully blended. Pour it back into the pot and bring to boil.

Zoodles soup 4.jpg

Add some soup powder, non-dairy cream, a pinch of cinnamon, salt and pepper to taste, mix gently, bring to boil again – ecco! You are done!

Zoodles soup 5

I think the prospective Signora Fibonacci missed out on many great benefits of spirals, but we enjoyed a delicious soup made with love!

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 small or 1 medium zucchini, unpeeled and sliced, or centers left after spiralizing 6 – 7 small zucchini
  • 1/2 small onion, sliced
  • 5 – 6 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1/3 inch (1 cm) grated ginger
  • 1/3 inch (1 cm) grated white turmeric
  • 1/3 cup fresh parsley stems, chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon pareve soup powder
  • 1/3 cup non-dairy cream
  • A pinch of cinnamon
  • Salt and pepper to taste

PROCEDURE

  • Saute onion, garlic, and zucchini in 1 tablespoon of olive oil until onion is translucent, zucchini and garlic are soft. Stir frequently.
  • Remove, transfer to 1 quart pot, cover with cold water. Let cool.
  • Place into food processor or blender, add ginger, turmeric, parsley stems. Pulse until creamy and well blended.
  • Transfer to pot, bring to boil, add soup powder, cream, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Stir, bring to boil, remove from heat and serve.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

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64 Comments Add yours

  1. leggypeggy says:

    Nice work. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Peggy; I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh what an awesome post, had never known the history behind the recipe. Looks so yummy too. Great.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Kamal; I am so glad you

      Like

      1. Welcome absolutely beautiful

        Liked by 1 person

    2. So sorry, I got cut off! Have a wonderful day!

      Like

      1. Welcome and you too have a great day

        Liked by 1 person

  3. What a delicious soup! 🙂 Really nice post, thank you! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for a lovely comment – I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Osyth says:

    Ooh … I was smitten already and then you added ginger and white turmeric and I spiralled upwards to heaven in my head! Genius and love converge in your kitchen, Dolly which is a pretty heavenly combination 💕

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Osyth, go ahead and spiral to heaven in your kitchen – enjoy the soup!
      But tell me, did you pick up these over-exaggerated epithets from the British or from the French? I should think the latter, but regardless, I am blushing all over the internet! 😻

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Osyth says:

        Oh I think you can safely say they have always been around me …. but I only EVER say what I mean!!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I thank you! However, as you know, there are different ways to express the same meaning; for instance, my Spanish speaking students call me Professora, which is already better than the English anthropomorphic “Professor”, but I adore the Italian Professoressa – isn’t it a fabulous word? Ergo, I adore your fabulous words!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Osyth says:

        Oh Italian … tanto ti amo – just the most luscious language! Professoressa is so much more ebullient and evocative than the rather plodding prosaic Professor of English. Thank you for loving my words. I am currently lovingly constructing a post for The Recipe Hunter which will contain a smooch to you 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Mille grazie, carissima! (All I can do in Italian is to ask and understand street directions and order my way in a restaurant!)

        Like

      5. Osyth says:

        All you need!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Another fabulous recipe blended with a wonderful story! 😺💕xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! From an accomplished storyteller like you, it’s a valuable compliment 😻

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you 💕😺💕xx

        Liked by 1 person

  6. We had zoodles last night! My kids loved that you call them zoodles! It was delish! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much – Ich bin ZEER zufriedn! (VERY happy!)! In my experience, to get kids to eat healthy, you have to let them crank kitchen gadgets and invent cute names for dishes. But you are such a kluge mama; I am sure you feed those shaine maidalach right!😻

      Liked by 1 person

  7. foodzesty says:

    This sounds so yummy!! I always enjoy reading the story before your recipe..:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear; I am so glad you like my recipes and my crazy stories!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. That’s a tasty way to use the leftover zucchini!
    Never hear of white turmeric. I need to check it out. Sounds interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Ronit! White turmeric has a light lemony taste, which contributed to this soup. I didn’t want to use the yellow one anyway because of the color. Another thing that happened was that after I poured coconut cream into the soup, I realized that I had grabbed the one flavored with hazelnuts. The nutty hint was so good that I think I might actually add some powdered nuts next time – maybe cashews?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for introducing me to this interesting ingredients. I’ll be looking for it.
        Culinary mistakes ended up many times as classics, so you’re in good company! I like the idea of cashews. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you; now I know I am on the right track because I was also thinking almonds. Cashews it is! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Almonds are also great, though cashews blend to a creamier texture. Either way will be good. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thank you for your advice; I was thinking in the same direction. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  9. [ Smiles ] You can’t go wrong with food and a good history lesson.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Renard! As long as people understand the difference between real history and the goofy funky version I sometimes present, with a straight face!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Wonderful! Sorry, now i understand “Zucchini” + “Noodles” = “Zoodles”. LOL
    Best greetings! Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Michael! I did not invent this name; spiralized zucchini is called “zoodles” everywhere. Be well,
      Dolly

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hello Dolly, thank you. Never heared before, but a good and also funny name. Also best wishes to you. 😉 Michael

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Kae Bucher says:

    :)… Hi Dolly, I have nominated your blog for the Liebster Award on my blog 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Kae, I am honored!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your series is fantastic. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for your kind comment!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I speak the truth. Love your recipes. Have a Happy weekend….it’s coming!!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. You too, have a great weekend!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. DeanJean says:

    Dolly, I can’t cook to hell and back, but I love reading the commentaries that you post with each recipe. I might ask my mum to peep at your page, I KNOW she would be delighted at the prospect of infinite recipes. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, darling, for your lovely comment – you made my day! 😸

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Clearly, Signorina Bellissima wasn’t enough of geek and was therefore beneath Signor Leonardo, lol. Math genius, unlike beauty, the rose, and the vegetable, does not fade with time.

    I just adore blended vegetable soups! They fill without being heavy, and taste hearty without the calories.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Eva, you are adorable – I love your sense of humor!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Nice looking backsides there!! Poor Leonardo!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. !
    I just adore blended vegetable soups!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much; I am so glad you like it!

      Like

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