I Give You Roti And a Big Hug

Today is my father’s first Yuhrzeit – the first anniversary of his passing. On this day, I want to share with you, Beautiful People, an incredible short article based on this week’s Torah reading, Parshas Tsav.

Hug Your Loved Ones Because You Can

 

It is now more than two years since my arms and lips stopped working. I ache to hug and kiss my children. I ache to speak to them, and tell them how much I love them and how proud I am of them.

Please read the original post here and come back for the recipe.

Dad 5.jpg

I am happy that for the last three years of his long and fruitful life, I was able to spend so much time with my father, and during the final few months, I was with him almost 24/7. I got to hug him and to hold him, to wash him and to dress him, to kiss his hand and to comfort him. To the last moment, he was telling jokes, and with his last breath, he gave the nurse “his lovely smile,” as she called it.  For this last Shabbos before Pesach, instead of challahs, in memory of my father who was brought up on Popaliks (for recipe, click here), I made an Indian variation of flatbread – Roti.

Roti 1.jpg

In my kitchen and for our purposes, spelt is considered gluten free. However, if you are allergic to gluten or have a celiac disorder, please consult your physician. Basic roti dough is made by mixing flour with water, a little olive oil, and a pinch of salt.  Mix it in a bowl until it doesn’t stick to the sides any more, than flip it onto a working surface lightly dusted with flour.

Roti 2.jpg

Knead it for a few minutes, to make it nice and smooth, and divide into 8 – 10 pieces, depending on the size of your frying pan. Grab your rolling pin and roll out each piece into a thin round the diameter of your frying pan. It helps to cover the rest of the pieces with a damp cloth to prevent drying out.

Roti 3

Just as popaliks, the reason Roti could be used instead of the traditional two challahs on Shabbos is that, even though they are baked stove top on a frying pan, there is no oil. In other words, they are not fried, but dry baked. It literally takes a couple of minutes on each side, but the pan must be very hot, so watch your hands!

Roti 4

I know my father would’ve enjoyed these beautiful, soft and delicious Roti! His shining Neshomah (soul) is reminding us to tell those we love that we love them – while we can!

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups white spelt flour (alternatively, whole wheat flour)
  • 3/4 cup water or more
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • A pinch of salt

PROCEDURE

  • Mix ingredients in bowl until dough pulls away from sides. On lightly dusted with flour surface, knead until smooth. Divide into 8 – 10 pieces, cover with damp cloth.
  • Preheat dry (not oiled) frying pan to high heat. Using a rolling pin, roll out each piece into a round equal in diameter to your frying pan.
  • Place each flat round on hot pan, bake for 1 – 11/2 minute on each side, until golden brown spots appear.
  • Roti could be warmed in the oven before Shabbos.

Enjoy!

 

 

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66 Comments Add yours

  1. Safek says:

    Your roti looks delicious and your story of your father is heartwarming. May his neshama receive an ailyah! I hope you and yours have a wonderful Shabbos!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, and you too!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. lghiggins says:

    As always, a fascinating post. Blessings to you as you remember your father and celebrate his life with this wonderful bread. I was confused by Rabbi Huwitz’s introductory paragraph until I read his short bio at the end of his inspiring post. Then it all made sense. He is an amazing man and his story certainly makes me stop and give thanks for the “simple” gifts of touch and speech. Thanks for sharing your story and his, Dolly!
    Linda

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much, dear Linda! I purposely did not insert his introductory paragraph in the beginning, in order to force the readers to read to the end. His story touched me very deeply, especially since I lost a nephew to the same disease a while ago. Unfortunately, with all the advances in medicine, there is still much suffering in the world, and we are still bound to lose our near and dear to various maladies. That’s why it is so important to express our feelings for them while we can!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. leggypeggy says:

    A lovely post and a beautiful tribute to your father. Hugs back to you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Peggy!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. tu1074 says:

    שיהי זכרו ברוך לעולם ועד

    Liked by 1 person

  5. annwjwhite says:

    I am glad you have such lovely memories of your father. You have his smile as well.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Ann! My son has the same smile, and when I look at him, I see my father.

      Like

  6. spearfruit says:

    Very nice post Dolly, thank you! I hope you have a great weekend. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Terry! Have a lovely weekend, too!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. So sorry for your loss. However what a loving way to celebrate your dad’s life and remembering all of the special times you spent together.
    I’m sure he will be there smiling his wonderful smile.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment! It means a lot to me!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Dolly, may his memory be a blessing forever.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ginger says:

    I also cared for my father in his last six weeks, it is a privilege to be so intimate with a parent! Your roti looks delicious, a favourite of mine.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You understand exactly how I feel about it! I am glad you liked the roti, thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. calmkate says:

        You really are the best cook … I could smell them from here lol

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you, dear Kate, I wish I could send them to you!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. calmkate says:

        Might be a bit stale even if you send them with FedX … You enjoy your feast with your loved ones.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Already did – they are best hot off the frying pan! But I was thinking in terms of magic, not FedEx…

        Liked by 1 person

      5. calmkate says:

        Sorry I was slow on the pick up … I will send my flying carpet immediately! Please just wrap and strap they should be here in moments lol

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, dear Mel!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Love the story of the popalik. Hugs to you for beautiful reminiscences. I am a fan of rotis too 😉 They are simple but heartening. Have a lovely weekend x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear! Have a great weekend as well!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Wonderful story, brings back all sorts of memories – sad and happy. THANK YOU!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your lovely comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Good Shabbos my friend, and a Happy Pesach too. Thank you for sharing your story of your father with us. Send a hug to you now. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your kind words. Happy Pesach to you and yours, and a big hug!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. 15andmeowing says:

    That was a beautiful post for your father, I am sorry he is no longer with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment! It means a lot to me!

      Like

  14. What a wonderful post Dolly and also a wonderful way to honour your father.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Myra!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Wonderful pictures, the shade and depth of the pictures are breath-taking, they attract you
    in as though you are a component of the composition. http://www.allads4u.com/author/neilqqu1996/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You must be kidding! I have no idea of the shade and depth, and the rest of the tricks; I take those pictures with my cellphone, and then adjust the brightness and color when I edit them. Thank you so much for your kind words – I am overwhelmed!

      Like

  16. Wish you a long life. May his neshomo have the highest aaliyah.
    I just know that he’s watching you from up above with the utmost pride at having raised such a caring, intelligent and wonderful daughter.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Omein! Thank you very much for your lovely comment and all the compliments. Have a kosher and freiliche Pesach! I am taking a coward’s way out: we are staying with friends and having both Sedorim with the Rabbi and his family. Having a bunch of kinderlach running around will, hopefully, take my mind off that empty chair at my table that was my father’s…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome… You’re not cowardly at all. There’s nothing cowardly about the way you are coping with your grief; as I wrote in my latest post, Peysekh is meant to be Freilichen. Whatever it takes to achieve that. Above all, you’ve suffered a tremendous loss- don’t feel bad about your approach to Peysekh! Wishing you a Kosher and Fraylichen Peysekh!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you, and the same to you and yours! And thank you for understanding.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Joëlle says:

    Inspiring post. I am sorry you lost your dad. This makes me appreciate even more the moments I share with my family. We take so many things for granted. Thank you, Dolly.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for understanding, dear Joelle!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging!

      Like

  18. Thank you for the story. How nice! And thank you also for the recipe! Have a nice start into the week! Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My pleasure, Michael, and thank you for your kind words!

      Like

  19. Thank you also for the link. I always try to find such a site. Never tried to use the word chabad itself.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re very welcome. http://www.chabad.org is the main Chabad site, in many languages, and from there you can link to many other sites.

      Like

  20. tu1074 says:

    חג פסח שמח וכשר שיהיה לך ולבני ביתך

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, and the same to you and yours!

      Like

  21. domnuio says:

    off topic:
    פסח שמח וכשר

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, and the same to you and yours!

      Like

  22. Joëlle says:

    Hi Dolly!
    Just wanted to share this article with you; I think you will agree with what is said. I am not sure I would have selected it for reading last year, but your delightful posts have broadened my horizon:

    Have a great week! I will be among the many people following your preparations for Passover 😊!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Joelle, thank you so much for a wonderful article! As you may have guessed, I am still making everything from scratch, and yes, my grandmother used to make Passover rolls and noodles out of potato starch. Since today, from morning until very late at night, we are not supposed to eat Matzah yet, but cannot already eat any non-Passover foods, I just made a huge mushroom and spinach omelet with coconut flour – yum! In my fight against carbs, I refuse to use potato starch, so thank G-d, there is kosher for Passover coconut flour.
      Unwittingly, you have put a guilt trip on me (it’s a joke – don’t worry!), as we are going away for a good part of Passover. I will be cooking and baking in the middle of the week, though, so there will be at least some posts, I promise!
      Have a great week – all the best!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. lilyandardbeg says:

    That is such a lovely post Dolly. In a few days it’ll be 24 years since my dad died-and I still miss him.
    Have a peaceful Passover x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for understanding, Alex!
      So far my Passover is going very nicely, thank you! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  24. What a beautiful lesson. I hope you are having a wonderful Passover. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Such a beautiful post. Your dad’s love and blessings are always looking after you. The other article you linked is amazing. And the rotis look delicious!❤❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear Mithai! If you approve of my rotis, I didn’t do too badly, did I?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m not qualified enough to judge your rotis😊😊❤❤ But they look too much delicious to get anyone’s taste buds running 😁😁😘😘

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you, sweetheart! You made my day!

        Like

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