Florentine Omelet for an Unlucky Queen

What an unlucky queen Mary Stuart was! Losing her father when she was only six days old, the baby queen was sent off to France at the age of five, to be married to a three-year old Dauphin Francis, the heir to the French throne. The actual marriage between the two little kids had to wait until they became of age – sixteen and fourteen. Meanwhile, the child bride, growing up as a precocious, beautiful and gifted girl with a sunny disposition, became everybody’s darling. Everybody, but one person, adored her. Unfortunately, that one person was the only person who counted – the reigning queen Catherine de Medici.

mary-stuart

Her father-in-law, King Henry II, loved little Mary. His favorite, Diane de  Poitiers, loved little Mary. No wonder Queen Catherine hated her! Add to that the fact the Mary was exceptionally tall for her times, willowy, very beautiful, vivacious, and, most importantly, very young. The aging queen, put aside for a power-hungry young favorite supported by a still younger queen-to-be, was brewing jealousy and cooking revenge!

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She had to bide her time, though, because the dowry of the baby Queen of Scotland was… Scotland! Before the wedding actually took place, Mary was made to sign a will that conferred upon her husband the throne of Scotland and her claim to England, if she died childless. And on the morning after the great wedding banquet, Queen Catherine invited her new daughter-in-law to have a Florentine breakfast. Well, since it was already past noon, it was more like lunch, so let’s call it brunch. Expecting something made with spinach – by that time everybody knew both the queen’s taste and the queen’s cooks – Mary cheerfully popped in, looking stunning and humming a fashionable ballad. What was offered to her definitely looked like there was some spinach in it, but in addition, some mysterious brown bits dotted a fluffy yellow omelet.

“What are those, Lady Mother?” – asked the girl.

“Those, mia carissima, are mushrooms.”

“Mush… Mash… Mesh…”

Queen Catherine had a reputation of being quite an expert on poisons, and Mary, although a teenager, was no dummy.

“Oh, Lady Mother, I am so sorry, but before I left Scotland, my mother made me swear that I would never eat anything I couldn’t pronounce. I promise I will practice my French diligently because I am dying to sample this delicious – what is it? Mishmash?”

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This is a total legend because mushrooms did not even appear on the royal table for another couple of hundred years. Until that time, they had not been considered edible, poisonous or not. But now we know better, so we start by slicing mushrooms very thin and stir frying them in a lightly misted frying pan.

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When mushrooms slightly soften and darken, we add shredded spinach and cook for another minute or so, until it is wilted but doesn’t lose its bright color.

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Meanwhile, you have to whisk eggs (you can use egg substitute for vegan version), then add non-dairy buttermilk (for recipe of Prostokvasha – Clabbered Milk, click here) and soy flour, and whisk together. Make it really fluffy! Season with salt and pepper and pour over your mushrooms and spinach.

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Throw some chopped fresh dill on top and wait until the edge start curling, then flip it and reduce heat. Cook for a few more minutes, and you are ready to serve.

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Poor Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland, having narrowly avoided being poisoned by one queen, still managed to get beheaded by another one, her cousin Queen Elizabeth I of England. While we contemplate her tragic life, full of passion and intrigue, we can savor breakfast fit for a queen.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 pint mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups firmly packed baby spinach, shredded
  • 3 large eggs or substitute
  • 1/2 cup non-dairy clabbered milk or buttermilk (plain non-dairy yogurt can be used)
  • 1/4 cup soy flour
  • A large handful of fresh dill, roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

PROCEDURE

  • Preheat and lightly mist deep frying pan with oil. Sear mushrooms until softened and darkened (about 2 – 3 minutes).
  • Add spinach, stir, cook together for 1 – 2 minutes until spinach is wilted but doesn’t lose color.
  • Whisk eggs, add clabbered milk and soy flour, whisk together until foamy. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Pour egg mixture over mushrooms and spinach, top with chopped dill. Fry for 5 – 7 minutes until edge starts curling. Turn over, reduce heat to medium, fry for 4 – 5 minutes.

Enjoy!

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61 Comments Add yours

  1. Thank you, good morninng 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good morning, good to hear from you!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. TalkaholicMe says:

    Great story behind this great omelette

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you – I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you. I wish you happy days. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you dear, I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. confabler says:

    You are my new favorite. (don’t tell others, they’ll be out for my blood😯) Loved the story. Brunch, humming a fashionable ballad, I had never imagined it like this.
    Since we have both, spinach and mushrooms, I’ll beg someone to cook it for me. I’m a horrible cook and a fantastic eater. What can we use as egg substitute?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much (my lips are sealed!) – it’s very gratifying to be a favorite! One teaspoon of nutritional yeast equals one egg. Mix it with soy flour first, then add to clabbered milk. It will also add a bit of a cheesy taste, which is nice. Enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. confabler says:

        Thank you🌷, will definitely try it.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Great post and recipe thank you 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Samantha! How are you?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A LOT better, thank you very much for asking 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am so glad to hear that! Get well and stay well!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. A very good story. The food looks good and nice pictures. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! I am glad you like it.

      Like

    1. Thank you for reblogging my post – I am overwhelmed!

      Like

  7. LydiaA1614 says:

    This really is my kind of post! I loved that period in British and European history the most. For me it was right up there with Louis Riel and the formation of Canada (where I live). Second, I love anything “Florentine” and this omelet sounds delicious! Thanks for sharing both!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! I am in love with Florence and everything Florentine so there are quite a few Florentine recipes you can find on my blog. Enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Beautifully written story Dolly.This omlette is my favourite.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, dear Anuradha, I am glad you like it!

      Like

  9. You wrote up that story so well. I found it really intruiging. Another fantastic post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! The story about mushroom omelet in 16th century is complete hogwash, but the characters and relationships are absolutely true. Little Mary did try to “queen it out” over Catherine during those two years of her reign in France, and it did not sit too well, as you can imagine, so she was shipped back to Scotland post haste the moment Francis died.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think that’s actually pretty sad. I don’t know why. Anyway, good shabbes!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It is, no doubt, a tragic story, in reality, but then, those were the times! Good Shabbos to you!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. What a wonderful story to accompany such a tasty looking dish! Looking forward to trying it out. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! I am glad you like it – enjoy!

      Like

  11. Eugenia says:

    Hmmm, very nice. I enjoy your posts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, Eugenia!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. crazykatya says:

    Ahahaha, this is a total Game of Thrones recipe! I love the story, sucked me right in and then I stayed for the yummy recipe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Game of Thrones – wow, what a reference! You’re right, and I’ve never thought of it this way! Thank you – I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. [ Smiles ] It is nice to know that you catered for me by providing me with the vegan version of this recipe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We aim to please! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Poor girl! At least she survived to eat another day! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. … and to have two more husbands, and to be abducted and raped, and to be jailed for many years, and then beheaded…

      Liked by 1 person

  15. marymtf says:

    Lovely recipe, but having read Josephine Tey’s ‘Daughter of Time” I can’t be as sympathetic about Mary Stuart as you are. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I personally am not, I was re-telling a legend about Catherine de Medici trying poison her, so my goal was to paint a sharp contrast between the two queens. That was also the reason for these two particular portraits. As a teenager, I was influenced by Schiller’s tragedy, but of course, later I learned the historical facts. I am glad you like the recipe!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. marymtf says:

    I meant to mention, Devorah, that your story gave me a chuckle. I can’t imagine meals without mushrooms. If I can, I will have them with everything except desserts. 🙃 Glad I can pronounce the word.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Funny! Thank you so much – I am glad you like it!

      Like

  17. lilyandardbeg says:

    That looks good! Mushrooms are my favourite food. Ever. Though I prefer wild/forest (or Asian) ones if I can lay my hands on them. I have never managed to find anything that would be a tasty egg substitute. Well, I’m not a strict vegan, so if my friends bring me their hens eggs (they have rescue hens) I’d still eat one (though I haven’t had any for years, my dogs like my friends’ free-range eggs so there’s none left for humans).
    I want mushrooms for dinner tonight…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I also prefer forest or Asian mushrooms, but they are dried, whenever I can get them, so I have to buy fresh locally grown ones at a farm market. Forgive my ignorance, my where do rescue hens come from? Are they found wandering the streets? I am serious – I don’t know!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lilyandardbeg says:

        We have a scheme here where you can buy a ‘broiler’ or ‘cage’ hen-or chicken really as they don’t survive long. There are very few shops selling caged eggs now as for the last few years we’ve had lots of campains and people seem to voted with their money 🙂 Most eggs are free-range, so there are fewer ‘rescue hens’ now, but a year or two ago it was rather popular for people to go to the shelter for their hens 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank you for explaining – that’s a new one on me!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Tali says:

    Dolly, I really enjoy reading your stories. You are a very talented story teller and a creative cook. Looking forward for more…

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Good story and this looks very delicious 🙂
    Can I exchange the soy flour with corn flour? Or what else?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your kind words! Corn flour will not work, but chick pea flour will be very good. You might also try oat, quinoa, or buckwheat flour. Good luck!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you, I have chick pea flour and will use that today 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Bon Appetite – enjoy!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I did make it and used chick pea flour and almond milk plus I added chopped walnuts too. It was very delicious 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I am so glad you enjoyed it, and thank you for telling me!

        Liked by 1 person

  20. Lovely story. Just been to Edinburgh castle where Mary was born so very current!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes – so very current!

      Like

  21. Joëlle says:

    I enjoyed the story as well as the recipe; I am adding dill to this week’s shopping list, thank you !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you dear Joelle, I am so glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

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