Dracula and Klyotzki Dumplings

Count Dracula really existed. He was born in Transylvania in fifteenth century and ruled the province called Wallachia. His name was Vlad III, and his last name was Dracul, which means Dragon in Romanian.

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He came by this name honestly, inheriting it from his father, Vlad II, who had joined a secret Order of the Dragon and assumed the name. In modern Romanian, dracul also means devil, and this translation went a long way towards inspiring all the vampire legends. Wait, but the Bram Stoker’s blood drinker is Count Dracula, whereas our man is Prince Dracul. Granted, he also wasn’t a very savory character, dispatching his enemies with extreme cruelty. His favorite execution method was impaling, for which he earned a nickname Tepes – the Impaler. Not a nice guy by any stretch of imagination, but a blood drinker? No. Anyway, what about the missing letter?

200px-elizabeth_bathory_portrait

We find the letter, together with the answer, when we look at this beautiful young lady, Elizabeth Bathory, a serial killer who was called The Blood Countess, or Countess Dracula. It’s very simple: in Romanian, dracul is a male devil, and dracula is female. Since Elizabeth Arden and Estee Lauder had not started their businesses yet, Countess Elizabeth devised an innovative method to preserve her youth and beauty; she bathed in the blood of virgins (or so the stories claim). Perhaps she did, or maybe she didn’t, but the fact is that she was brought to trial and convicted of causing more than 600 deaths of young women, presumably virgins. The various atrocities she committed were indisputably proven by physical evidence. She lived more than a century after Vlad the Impaler’s death, but in the same region of Europe, so apparently the two monsters merged into one legend.

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What do all these bloody old legends have to do with a delicious soup? The Countess Dracula’s father, King Stefan Bathory, ruled, among many large and small provinces, a feudal stronghold called Klecia, today a city of Klyotzk (Klezk) in Belorus. Even though similar easy, cheap, and filling dumplings exist in practically all cuisines throughout the world, Belorussians proudly claim the Klyotzkian origins of their version.

Klyotzki 1.jpg

All you need is flour and water, and maybe a bit of oil, to soften the dough. However, all cook books recommend to use milk instead of water, and some suggest to include eggs as well. I am making a traditional peasant recipe, without eggs, and instead of dairy milk, I use soy milk. It does make a difference, so that even with whole wheat flour, my Klyotzki come out light and fluffy. If you prefer not to use soy, any milk substitute of your choice will do. Baking powder and a pinch of salt also help.

Klyotzki 2.jpg

Mix all this together, add a little water if the dough is too thick, and refrigerate it for about ten minutes. Meanwhile, heat up your soup. Which soup? Whatever you have. Klyotzki will be a welcome addition to any soup, as long as it is hot. I usually drop them either into my  Everything Soup (for recipe, click here) or my Summer Cabbage Soup (for recipe, click here), but trust me, any soup will only benefit from these tasty morsels! Bring it to boil and drop little pieces of dough into your boiling soup. You can use a teaspoon or just pinch little bits off. Simmer for about five minutes, and it’s ready.

klyotzki-4

Here is my Summer Cabbage Soup, full of nutritious and filling Klyotzki, so forget about all legendary monsters and go get a spoon!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons soy milk, or any non-dairy milk of your choice
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon water, if needed

PROCEDURE

  • Mix all ingredients until well blended for soft dough.
  • Refrigerate for 10 minutes.
  • Drop small portions into boiling soup, cook on medium for 5 minutes.
  • Alternatively, cook in boiling water and serve with any sauce as side dish.

Enjoy!

 

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62 Comments Add yours

  1. Delicious recipe and fascinating history-thank you :)x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much – I am glad you like it! I tried to make it entertaining, yet not as gory as it actually was.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. lilyandardbeg says:

    they look yummy 🙂 I’ll try them with buckwheat flour today (I’m making a stew with wild mushrooms and I think they could work there)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. They will work great. I have made them with buckwheat, and it lends them a sort of a nutty flavor – delicious!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lilyandardbeg says:

        I have made them, they work (my food never looks as good as yours, though)🙂 Thank you for the idea🙂

        Like

      2. lilyandardbeg says:

        Actually: my food never looks good. Full stop.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Brian and Lily look gorgeous, and they are your models. Food is mine. Cats would probably be, if they stay still for photo ops.

        Like

  3. It is always nice to read the story of how some of the food we consume came to be. It’s food for thought. :o)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much – I am glad you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. PTcontender says:

    Interesting stories! Did not know about Elizabeth bathing in blood of virgins, but I had heard of Vlad the Impaler. Cool how the stories were melded together over time. Also, love the simple recipe. Seems very doable :))

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words. Nobody confirmed the bathing in blood part, but what they found in the dungeons of her castle at the time of arrest is well documented. It would make your hair stand on end!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. PTcontender says:

        Haha I bet it would. What a creepy lady

        Liked by 1 person

      2. She outdid Marquis de Sade by far!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. feistyfroggy says:

    Another very educational and entertaining post! Klyotski sounds very tasty as well!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! I discovered Elizabeth Bathory years ago in my first Statistics course. She was mentioned in the very first chapter of the textbook as an example of historical research. As a result, we nicknamed the course “Sadistics.”

      Liked by 1 person

      1. feistyfroggy says:

        LOL @ “Sadistics.” That sounds about right for a statistics course!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Then I picked the statistics professor as my dissertation chair, and everybody predicted that he would have my blood…

        Liked by 1 person

      3. feistyfroggy says:

        That is hilarious!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Dumplings are a great way to make a heartier soup. Looks delicious. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ronit. A comment from you is always treasured!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Interesting story 🙂
    This balls are usual in Denmark for soup. I don’t know for how many years, but at least 100. In old times people made them at home, today mostly buy them in the shops.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your comment. Yes, I know that dumplings are common not only all over Europe, but in other parts of the world as well, but they are a little different everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Tali says:

    Thank you, Dolly, for the recipe. It’s looks delicious. I’ll have to try it…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Tali! I am glad you like it.

      Like

  9. randyjw says:

    I never knew about Countess Elizabeth; hmmm… The dumplings sound delicious; I’ll have to try your recipe sometime!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much! As to the Countess, Google her, when you have a chance. What they found in the dungeons of her castle when they came to arrest her would make Marquis de Sade look like a boy scout.

      Like

  10. Joëlle says:

    Have you ever read Bram Stoker’s novel? Well written, it really gives you the chills!
    I think teff flour would also work very well In this recipe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love Bram Stoker’s novel, I’ve watched every movie ever made, and I am also a big fan of Anne Rice’s vampire series.
      I had to google Teff flour, and it sounds very interesting. I’ll try it, thank you for the tip!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Yummy this looks delicious 😋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much – I am glad you like it!

      Like

  12. Reblogged this on koolkosherkitchen and commented:

    Today’s word prompt is VILLAIN. This post will introduce you to two for the price of one: a villain and a villainess! Are you scared, Beautiful People? Have a bowl of comforting soup.
    https://allaboutwritingandmore.wordpress.com/category/daily-word-prompt/

    Like

    1. Thank you for a pingback.

      Like

  13. The soup looks hearty enough to sustain the thought of an evening with the prince who had a penchant for impaling 😉 Just sayin’. He might have asked for a pretty head on a pike in front of him while dining? I think Henry VIII and he were soulmates.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. While I appreciate your warm relationship with Bonny Harry, Prince Vlad sort of impaled people through a different orifice, rarely reaching heads.
      I am sure a prince you have on mind would have more pleasant impaling techniques!
      Thank you so much for your sweat comment, darling!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Poor Harry might blanch at the thought. Henry 😀
        Vlad was on another level indeed. Cruelty however flourished in both their hearts.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I don’t think Henry was exceptionally cruel, though. He was a product of his age, no more and no less. Vlad, however, was considered diabolical even by the Turks who chopped heads off left and right, albeit honorably and painlessly, and who finally conquered him.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Hmm his headless victims might have something else to say surely about it 🙂 Vlad does sound like a different kettle of fish altogether, you are right.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Is that a grimacing cat, Dolly? 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Not at all – it’s a “cat with a wry smile”! She is winking at you, dear! 😻

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Perfect timing! We’re having chicken on dumplings and was looking for a recipe and here it is! Yummy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What a meeting of the minds – I am so glad! Enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. LOL. We just finished dinner and we can now say with authority these were the best! It made the meal perfect, thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You made my day – wow!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. 🙂 Your recipes are always perfect!!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. You are so sweet! 😸

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, dear; I am so glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

  15. Osyth says:

    My last cat whom I adored unconditionally and immeasurably and who died a horrid death was called Boost The Impaler in honour of Vlad. Boost, a Blue Abyssinian, thought himself a great assailant of birds and rodents and tragically it was a poisoned rat who took him. I swore I would never have another feline. But I can eat this soup in his honour – he was in so many ways one of the loves of my life 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We believe that cats have souls of righteous people, to the point that some people (I am one of them, of course), greet cats on the street. I am sure that the righteous soul of your beloved Boost inhabits another feline body, bring much joy to people. 😻 Enjoy the soup in his memory!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Osyth says:

        I am happy with this notion …. very happy indeed 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am happy to have made you happy! 😻

        Liked by 1 person

  16. oldpoet56 says:

    Excellent story, I did not know of the ‘Lady Blood’ though, thank you for the excellent read, I enjoyed it so I am going to reblog this article for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Ted! I am so glad you enjoyed my little historical tidbit.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. A_Boleyn says:

    Delicious dumplings and a couple of interesting villains … fun post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aren’t villains always interesting! Thank you so much for your comment; I am so glad you find it entertaining.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. jonahzsong says:

    Totally enjoyed the story and the recipe. I really like your presentation of the dish. It’s so inviting.

    A tidbit: Not far from me is Dacula, GA. It might be named after the villein or villainous, who may still live there, and the dropped “r” is only to throw off Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

    Lord Bless, Keep, Shine. . .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is hilarious! Now that you mention it, I should’ve inserted Buffy into this post somehow.
      Thank you for your kind comment; I am really glad you enjoyed the post!

      Like

    1. Thank you for reblogging.

      Like

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